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Military Images

Finding Aid: May/June 1992

The complete issue

Vol. XIII, No. 6
(32 pages)

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Inside

Cover image
A quarter-plate ambrotype from the Don V. Bates Jr. Collection is a charming view of a Civil War era couple in a phaeton marked “Buckley’s Newspaper Express” on the side of the basket.

Editor’s Desk (p. 1)
The editor informs readers about The Daguerreian Society, a nonprofit incorporated in 1988 that is dedicated to the history, art and science of the world’s first form of photography.

Mail Call (pp. 2-3)
The letters to the editor includes two comments about reproduction images and how more positive approaches may help distinguish them from original images.

Passing in Review (p. 5)
Seven publications are mentioned, including Myles Keogh: The Life and Legend of an “Irish Dragoon” in the 7th Cavalry (Upton & Sons) edited and compiled by J.P. Langellier, Kurt Cox and Brian Pohanka, Lejeune: A Marine’s Life, 1867-1942 (University of South Carolina Press) by Merrill Barnett, The Book of Military Blunders (ABC-Clio) by Geoffrey Regan, Echoes of Glory (Time-Life Books), The Long Arm of Lee (The University of Nebraska Press) by Jennings Wise and more.

Uniforms & History by Michael J. McAfee (p. 6)
In “13th Regiment, New York State Militia,” McAfee details the organization and distinctive uniform of this regiment. The story is illustrated with a portrait of an unidentified sergeant from the regiment.

“Tell It to the Chaplain:” The Philippine Ordeal of Signal Corps Photographer Leland Smith by Brad Prowse (p. 7)
Captured by Filipino insurgents in October 1899, Leland Smith was held with about 40 other prisoners and gained his release in January 1900. Details of his time in enemy hands are detailed here. A photograph of Leland with other prisoners illustrates the text.

Sunshine to Greenbacks: An incomplete history of Ohio photographer Emmor Crew by Timothy Brookes (pp. 8-9)
A brief history of the career of the Alliance, Ohio, photographer is illustrated with five Civil War era cartes de visite soldier portraits. Including Ben Crew, the photographer’s brother, who died in the Sultana disaster.

Claude Levet: Late 20th Century Collodion Artist: A Retrospective (pp. 10-15)
A survey of 16 representative images taken between 1990 and 1991 depict re-enactors and living historians. The relative youth and slimness of the individuals makes these modern images difficult to distinguish from 19th century originals.

The Quincy City Guard, Antebellum Volunteers by John Graf (pp. 16-17)
Two full-plate daguerreotypes from the Historical Society of Quincy and Adams County, Ill., are introduced with a brief history of early American militias. One of the images is a portrait of Capt. E.W. Godfrey and Lt. U.S. Penfield. The other image is an outdoor view of the militiamen taken in 1855 or 1856.

The Memoirs of a Missouri Soldier: August Reimers edited by Hartman McIntosh (pp. 18-23)
Excerpts of Reimer’s 1905 memoirs include his service in the 3rd Missouri Infantry, a 90-day regiment formed in 1861, and the 15th Missouri Infantry. Two portraits of him illustrate the narrative.

What a Mess! Views of Military Cuisine (pp. 24-29)
A survey of 11 photographs from the Civil War through World War show soldiers posed with various cooking equipment and food.

Stragglers (pp. 30-31)
Solo photos of the interesting and the unique, from the collections of our readers includes three navy images: A view of the Oregon in action in 1898, an unidentified Civil War era ironclad on the Mississippi River with the letters S and X on its stacks and a sailor from the Ticonderoga.

Sutlers’ Row (p. 32)

Back cover
A carte de visite from the Seward Osborne Collection pictures Brevet Maj. Gen. Benjamin F. Kelley.

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