Rss

Archives for :

Nominees for the 2022 AHF Awards

It’s contest season! The call for entries for the Army Historical Foundation’s annual Distinguished Writing Awards competition is out, and I’m pleased to announce four nominees from 2022 issues of Military Images magazine. They are:

“How They Went Forth to the Harvest of Death”: A concise account of the U.S. Regular Infantry at Gettysburg by Charles T. Joyce, featuring images from the author’s collection (Summer 2022)
The story of the diehard U.S. Regulars at the Battle of Gettysburg has been largely overlooked. This account reveals the trials and tribulations they endured.

Scoundrel: The rise and fall of Union spy chief Lafayette Curry Baker by David B. Holcomb (Summer 2022)
Lafayette C. Baker’s journey took him from San Francisco vigilante to Allen J. Pinkerton adversary to controversial spy chief and captor of Booth. His story.

Illinois Faces of the Civil War introduced by Austin Sundstrom and featuring portraits from the image collecting community (Autumn 2022)
Representative portraits and stories of Illinoisans who participated in the Civil War includes 45 images, most published for the first time.

Birthplace of the American Zouave: How Elmer Ellsworth spread Zouave mania through Illinois and the rest of America by Ron Field (Autumn 2022)
The origins of Elmer Ephraim Ellsworth and how he fostered Zouave mania first in Chicago, Ill., and through the rest of America.

“Life in the Civil War Research Trail” is hosted by Ronald S. Coddington, Editor and Publisher of Military Images magazine. Learn more about our mission to showcase, interpret and preserve Civil War portrait photography at militaryimagesmagazine.com.

Happy 200th Birthday, Mathew Brady

By Cliff Krainik

Washington, D.C. – Saturday, September 17, 2022

On a bright, beautifully clear Indian summer afternoon about a hundred invited guests attended the unveiling of the new interactive memorial to Mathew B. Brady in Congressional Cemetery. The memorial was erected on a double plot right next to Brady’s final resting place and features state-of-the-art photography displays. The expansive memorial was the creation and personal contribution of photographic historian Larry West of Washington, D.C. From its inception the site was designed to engage and inform visitors about Brady’s heroic efforts to record the history of his era through the enduring power of photography. West’s tribute to Brady evolved gradually over a period of four years. The central element incorporates a granite wall 8 feet high by 8 feet wide that tells in detail Brady’s life story. On the back side of the wall are two bronze plaques with Brady’s biographical information about his photographic career, his success, financial disasters and his relegated obscurity.

Overview of the Mathew Brady Memorial showing the photo gallery wall, the statues of Lincoln and Frederick Douglass and the life size photograph of Brady posed with his camera.  Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.  Photograph by Jack Krainik

On the front of the wall are positioned eighty-five fired porcelain reproductions of Brady photographs, mostly by Brady and his photographers.  A group of fourteen portraits of Brady, his wife Julia and his nephew and business associate, Levin Handy are displayed in one section. Another grouping of a dozen or so images portrays Abraham Lincoln, his assassin, the conspirators and their execution. Twelve images of African Americans grace the Brady display including the likenesses of Sojourner Truth, Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglass, and William Still, “Chief Conductor” of the Underground Railroad. Of course Brady’s portraits of famous personalities from all walks of life are here too among them Generals Grant and McClellan, First Lady Dolly Madison, writers Walt Whitman, and Charles Dickens, P.T. Barnum and Tom Thumb, Thomas Edison, Oglala Lakota leader Red Cloud, General Custer and “The March King” John Philip Sousa who, incidentally, reposes not very far from the Brady Memorial. To illustrate how many important Brady photographs are of an iconic nature, part of the display presents United States postage stamps with the portraits of famous Americans taken by Brady including presidents Zachary Taylor, Abraham Lincoln, U.S. Grant, Rutherford B. Hayes plus Clara Barton founder of the American Red Cross and the artist and inventor Samuel B. Morse.  In a final acknowledgement to Brady’s connection to the U.S. Postal system, Larry West fashioned a section of portraits relating to the Pony Express.  Shown are the likenesses of Buffalo Bill Cody who rode the Pony Express at age fifteen, a group of the first riders, Richardson, Fry, C & G. Cliff and a fine likeness of Sophia Hollenberg, co-founder of the Kansas Station– all portraits taken by Brady. 

State-of-the art, life size, fired porcelain photograph of Mathew Brady. The original portrait of Brady wearing a duster and straw hat, was taken shortly after his return from the ill-fated sojourn to the battlefield of Bull Run, July 1861. His likeness is position next to a bronze rendering of a large format, circa 1860s  wet-plate view camera. Photograph by Jack Krainik 

Facing the wall with its multitude of imagery is a state-of-the- art, full-length, life size fired porcelain photograph of Mathew Brady. The original portrait of Brady wearing a duster and straw hat, was taken shortly after his return from the ill-fated sojourn to the battlefield of Bull Run, July 1861. His likeness is position next to a bronze rendering of a large format, circa 1860s  wet-plate view camera.

Approaching the Brady and camera ensemble are two life size heroic statues of President Abraham Lincoln and the great American social reformer and statesman Frederick Douglass. Lincoln holds a sheet of paper in hand with a written excerpt from the Emancipation Proclamation – “All persons held as slaves shall be then, thenceforward and forever free. Done at the city of Washington, this first day of January in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty three.  By the President Abraham Lincoln”   Frederic Douglass, the most photographed man of the 19th century, holds a walking stick given to him by Mary Lincoln after the assassination of the president. The bronze cane is an exact replica copied from the original owned by the National Park service on display at Cedar Hill, Frederick Douglass’s estate in Anacostia.  Both statues were cast at the Matthew Foundry near Venice, Italy then shipped to Georgia for assembly before installation at Congressional Cemetery. 

Larry West expressed his thoughts about Mathew Brady on two bronze plaques attached to the memorial:

Two bronze plaques with Brady’s biographical information about his photographic career, his success, financial disasters and his relegated obscurity are placed on the reverse side of the Memorial Wall. Photograph by Jack Krainik

 “THE CAMERA IS THE EYE OF HISTORY   Mathew Brady was one of the most outstanding early photographers in American history, with his work from 1844 to 1895. He is credited today as the Father of Photojournalism. This memorial was erected to honor him.  His photography, as well as his other attributes & accomplishments. From the 1840s, through the 1860s, and for decades thereafter, he photographed the rich and famous; politicians & soldiers; & everyday men and women—across the races. His telling images impacted society; they still resonate with us. The bronzes of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass standing here are based on his images. He was an entrepreneur, photo-innovator, and leader – enabling him to develop teams of assistants, in the field and gallery, including Alexander Gardner, Timothy O’Sullivan, George Barnard and Anthony Berger.  These employees, in his New York and Washington galleries, and field teams, often performed actual camera operation, due to his deteriorating eyesight, but he was always a strong supervisor and posing artist.  His brand, “PHOTO BY BRADY”, in both America and Europe, was established by his ability to secure sittings, capture the essence of the subject matter, innovate as photo-technologies changed – & managed people.”

Larry West of Washington, D.C.,  the creator of the Brady Memorial, points to a photograph of Red Cloud and a delegation of  Oglala Lakota who visited Washington after the Civil War. Photograph by Jack Krainik

Another plaque is placed on the right side of the columbarium furthest from Brady’s grave. The inscription reads: “Mathew Brady was a risk-taker from gallery financing to battlefields with cannons.  He and his team jeopardized life and limb to capture the horror of Civil War brutality and death, and then bring it into public view. In the actual self-portrait of him standing opposite you, next to the bronze of his camera, he wears the sword given him for self-protection, at the devastating 1861 battle of Manassas – occurring only 30 miles from this spot.

Mathew is buried in the Handy family plot close to us here. Next to him is his lifelong loving wife, Julia Handy.  Also here is Levin Handy, his nephew, who learned from & worked for Mathew for decades.  Levin also became very successful, later photographing the Library of Congress construction.  When Mathew was in extreme financial hardship in later year, Levin financed and housed Mathew and Julia, and was even a Brady bankruptcy creditor. Levin eventually inherited the Brady photography business.”

Larry West created and gave the Mathew Brady Memorial for generations to understand the importance of Brady’s photographs.  Larry is flanked by life size bronze statues of President Abraham Lincoln and statesman Frederick Douglass. The statues were cast in Italy and brought to Congressional Cemetery during difficult pandemic times. Photograph by Jack Krainik 

At three in the afternoon as the sun arched westward radiating the acres of stones at Congressional Cemetery, Larry West stepped up to the podium and thanked all for attending. He recounted his lifelong interest in historic photography and spoke about the important collection of antebellum images, mostly daguerreotypes, made by talented African American photographers that he assembled and sold to the Smithsonian American Art Museum. He told about his admiration for the visionary Mathew Brady and how he felt compelled to help educate the current generation of school children about the legacy that Brady had given to them. In turn he introduced the three speakers for the occasion:  Cliff Krainik of Warrenton, Virginia, a photographic historian gave a brief account of Brady’s life. He spoke about the visit to Brady’s New York gallery by the Prince of Wales, the future King of England, Edward VII (Queen Elizabeth II great grandfather) and how Brady received a gold ring from the Prince. Cliff related how Brady in 1863 photographed a delegation of Southern Plains Indians who came to visit President Lincoln in the White House. Yellow Bear chief of the Kiowa died a few days after the group photograph and was buried in Congressional Cemetery just a short distance from Brady’s grave.  Next, Grant Romer, a world authority on early photography and former Conservator of Photography at the George Eastman House spoke about the lasting quality of photography and how important Brady’s work was in creating an historic memory for the present day; and lastly David Kent, President of the Lincoln Group of the District of Columbia, gave an account of the significant role Mathew Brady’s  Cooper Union portrait of candidate Abraham Lincoln played in the election of 1860 and of the several Lincoln portrait sessions in Brady’s Washington gallery during the Civil War.

Speakers at the dedication of the Mathew Brady Memorial. Left to right:  David Kent, President of the Lincoln Group of the District of Columbia, Grant Romer, an international authority on early photography and former Conservator of Photography at the George Eastman House, and Cliff Krainik of Warrenton, Virginia, photographic historian, dealer and appraiser of 19th century photography. Photograph by Jack Krainik

After the presentations were made the congenial group assembled around the memorial and a rollicking toast was offered to the great Civil War photographer –  Happy Birthday Mathew Brady !   In the glow of the ebbing afternoon I felt Brady’s presence and imagined him among us directing his assistants where best to position their cameras to record the event.  “See over there” whispered Brady –“ That grave stone is the prefect height. Please have Mr. West sit there – I’ll tell you how to take his portrait.” 

Learn more about the memorial: “The Camera Is the Eye of History”: A new memorial in Washington, D.C., honors Mathew Brady

Official site: Historic Congressional Cemetery

Finding Aid: Autumn 2022

A complete table of contents for the Autumn 2022 issue of Military Images magazine, and information about how to purchase single issues and subscriptions.

Vol. XL, No. 4
(80 pages)

Purchase print issue
Purchase PDF
Subscribe to MI

Explore the MI Archives:
Browse | Advanced search | Tutorial

Inside

Cover image
A sixth plate tintype from the Allen Cebula Collection pictures Charles W. Thompson of the 15th Illinois Infantry.

Table of Contents (p. 1)

Editor’s Desk (p. 2)
Brisk sales of top-tier images are an indicator of a healthy collector’s market. However, we do need affordable images to sustain growth in the hobby.

Mail Call (pp. 3-4)
Feedback includes praise for stories in the last issue, including a profile of Lafayette Curry Baker, and support for a Mississippi image identification.

Military Anthropologist (p. 4)
A survey of 190 identified Confederate portraits published in Military Images reveals format variations in six Southern states.

Passing in Review (p. 6)
We recommend two books: Colonels in Blue by Roger D. Hunt (McFarland) and White House Renovation Souvenirs by Wayne Smith (Glade Valley History Press).

Photo Sleuth by Kurt Luther (pp. 8-10)
A review of a grouping of U.S. Colored Troops officer photos in the American Civil War Museum collection reveals partial and misidentifications.

Antebellum Warriors (p. 12)
A sixth plate tintype of an axe-wielding sapper, the 1850s military equivalent of the Corps of Engineers of the Regular Army.

Most Hallowed Ground (p. 14)
Edward Bancroft Williston of the 2nd U.S. Artillery distinguished himself and his battery on the front lines during the 1864 Battle of Trevilian Station.

The Honored Few (p. 16)
Charles Henry Smith led his 1st Maine cavalrymen against Confederate Maj. Gen. Wade Hampton’s troopers, and later received the Medal of Honor.

The Citizenry (p. 18)
Daughters of the Regiment played an important role during the early days of the war, rallying recruits and appealing to patriotic impulses.

Fakes, Forgeries and Frauds by Perry M. Frohne (p. 20)
The must-have piece of fake detection equipment in your toolkit is this 10x magnifier.

Illinois Faces introduced by Austin Sundstrom and featuring portraits from the image collecting community (pp. 23-41)
Representative portraits and stories of Illinoisans who participated in the Civil War includes 45 images, most published for the first time.

Birthplace of the American Zouave by Ron Field (pp. 42-50)
The origins of Elmer Ephraim Ellsworth and how he fostered Zouave mania first in Chicago, Ill., and through the rest of America.

Beddo’s Bravery by Ronald S. Coddington, featuring artifacts from the Paul Denver collection (pp. 52-57)
At Shiloh, Sgt. Ira Beddo of the 11th Illinois Infantry proved his valor when, though badly wounded, he carried the colors in a memorable charge.

Hannibal’s Freedom by Ronald S. Coddington (pp. 58-61)
During the waning weeks of the war in North Carolina, the 12th Illinois Infantry mustered a new recruit into its ranks—am enslaved man.

Women Photographers of Illinois by Henry A. Pomerantz (pp. 62–63)
The author has recorded more than 550 photographers operating in Illinois during the Civil War years, including 14 women.

Getting a History Fix Behind of and In Front of the Camera: Q@A with Will Eichler (pp. 64-66)
Will Eichler discusses his work in the film industry, passion for the Civil War, and history-related projects including short films and HistoryFix.

Material Culture by Ronald S. Coddington (pp. 70-71)
The Dimick Target Rifle, produced in St. Louis, appealed to hunters in peacetime. During the Civil War, sharpshooters in the 66th Illinois Infantry used it.

Behind the Backdrop: Origins, artistry and photographers by Adam Ochs Fleischer (pp. 72-73)
“The Cavalry and Cannon backdrop” was used at Camp Hendershott in Iowa, and likely Illinois, by photographer Charles S. Newberry.

Vignette By Scott Valentine (p. 76)
Charles Augustus Oliver ran away from home and joined the 11th New Jersey Infantry. He suffered wounds at Fredericksburg and Gettysburg.

Stragglers (p. 78)
Portraits of a Virginia soldier, a Confederate who likely hailed from Alabama, and an officer in the 13th New York State Militia.

The Last Shot (p. 80)
Eli F. Chittenden had a passion for printing. After joining the 14th Illinois Infantry, he utilized his skills as publisher of a camp newspaper, the Skirmisher.

Looking for a Portrait Photograph of a Civil War Veteran? We Can Help.

The search for portrait photographs of specific Civil War veterans can be challenging and time-consuming—and incredibly rewarding when you look upon the face of the person you’ve been seeking.

Military Images might be able to help you in your quest. We are building a database of all the identified U.S. and C.S. soldiers, sailors and other participants that have appeared in the magazine since our founding in 1979.

Each entry in the database includes five major categories of information:

  • Individual’s name
  • State, unit and branch of service
  • Issue and page number of Military Images (and a link to the archived version on jstor.org)
  • Image format and information about the photographer
  • Relevant notes

As of this writing, 1979 and from 2014 to the latest issue are available to search. Over time, we will be adding the issues from 1980 to 2013. In the meantime, please refer to the Military Images Index created by the Civil War Museum in Kenosha, Wis. This page has documented identified soldiers and sailors that have appeared in the magazine from 1979-2014.

The database is a public service for collectors, researchers, genealogists and others interested in Civil War portrait photography. Visit the database. We encourage your feedback.

Finding Aid: Summer 2022

A complete table of contents for the Summer 2022 issue of Military Images magazine, and information about how to purchase single issues and subscriptions.

Vol. XL, No. 3
(80 pages)

Purchase print issue
Purchase PDF
Subscribe to MI

Explore the MI Archives:
Browse | Advanced search | Tutorial

Inside

Cover image
A quarter-plate ambrotype from the Mathew L. Oswalt M.D. Collection of pictures a Mississippi soldier.

Table of Contents (p. 1)

Editor’s Desk (p. 2)
Can an original Civil War photograph become a non-fungible token (NFT)? Should it? The editor created one in an effort to answer these questions.

Mail Call (pp. 3-4)
Feedback includes information about Missouri’s Schofield Hussars and notice of the passing of Cary Delery, longtime proprietor of The Historical Shop.

Military Anthropologist (p. 4)
A survey of 869 identified Civil War military portraits reveals that ambrotypes dominate in the South, and cartes de visite were most popular in the North.

Passing in Review (pp. 6-8)
Bill Hendrick reviews Ends of War: The Unfinished Fight of Lee’s Army after Appomattox by Caroline E. Janney (University of North Carolina Press).

Photo Sleuth by Kurt Luther (pp. 10-12)
The National Portrait Gallery’s Civil War collection includes an image of three unidentified U.S. officers. The author investigates and identifies them.

Antebellum Warriors (p. 14)
A daguerreotype of a soldier ornately dressed in gold braid reminds one of “Old Fuss and Feathers,” Winfield Scott. He may be a photographer-militia officer.

Most Hallowed Ground (p. 16)
Artworks picturing David Farragut lashed to Hartford’s rigging at Mobile Bay are accurate. The man who secured him is profiled here: John Crittenden Watson.

The Honored Few (p. 18)
Edward Washburn Whitaker of the 1st Connecticut Cavalry received a Medal of Honor for an 1864 act of courage, but it best know for Appomattox.

The Citizenry by Elizabeth A. Topping(p. 20)
In “Heroines of the Hearth,” the author pays tribute to women who contributed in many ways to support the troops and the country during the Civil War.

Fakes, Forgeries and Frauds by Perry M. Frohne (pp. 22-23)
Results of our “Fake Radar Contest” — a chance to test your knowledge of fake cartes de visite and win a prize!

Mississippi Faces: Portraits from the Matthew L. Oswalt, M.D., Collection (pp. 24-37)
Representative portraits and stories of Mississippi men who served in the Confederate army and fought in the Eastern and Western Theaters of the Civil War.

A Scottish Blockade Runner: The life and times of Joannes Wyllie, commander of the Ad-Vance by John F. Messner (pp. 38-41)
Much is known about the exploits of the blockade runner Ad-Vance, but very little about its captain, Joannes Wyllie — until now.

“How They Went Forth to the Harvest of Death”: A concise account of the U.S. Regular Infantry at Gettysburg by Charles T. Joyce, featuring images from the author’s collection (pp. 43-51)
The story of the diehard U.S. Regulars at the Battle of Gettysburg has been largely overlooked. This account reveals the trials and tribulations they endured.

Under the Banner of Emancipation and National Unity: The Woman’s National Loyal League and the call to political activism by Ronald S. Coddington, featuring an image from the Mike Werner Collection (pp. 52-57)
In 1863, loyal Union women led by Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton formed a new organization to support the war and lobby for a human rights agenda.

Scoundrel: The rise and fall of Union spy chief Lafayette Curry Baker by David B. Holcomb (pp. 59–67)
Lafayette C. Baker’s journey took him from San Francisco vigilante to Allen J. Pinkerton adversary to controversial spy chief and captor of Booth. His story.

Behind the Overlooked Stories of the Untold Civil War: Q@A with Paul Hoza (pp. 69-71)
The host of the popular podcast Untold Civil War talks about his fascination with history, the 79th New York Highlanders, and his media journey.

Material Culture by Frank Graves (p. 72)
The Walch Navy revolver is a rarity. By one estimate, only 200-300 were produced. Images of soldiers armed with the weapon are equally as rare. Here’s one.

Behind the Backdrop: Origins, artistry and photographers by Adam Ochs Fleischer (pp. 74-75)
In “House Near the Susquehanna,” Fleischer examines the distinctive painted canvas featured in photographs by Kern & Gaugler of Selinsgrove, Pa.

Vignette By Scott Valentine (p. 76)
In “Alone in His Glory,” we meet Lt. Col. Henry H. Pearson of the 6th New Hampshire Infantry. He made the ultimate sacrifice at Petersburg in 1864.

Stragglers (p. 78)
Portraits of a Texas officer, a Modoc War veteran, and a rare late Civil War daguerreotype of a U.S. soldier wearing a corps badge on his cap.

The Last Shot (p. 80)
Hardtack and coffee were standard fare for most U.S. soldiers in the Civil War — and the subject of ridicule to weary troops craving a varied diet.

Military Images Wins AHF Award

Congratulations to Paul Russinoff for winning an award of excellence in the prestigious Army Historical Foundation Distinguished Writing Awards. The annual competition honors books and articles published in 2021.

Paul won the top award in the Journals and Magazine category for “A Savior of the Capitol,” the cover story in our Spring 2021 issue. Paul tells the story of Benjamin Franklin Watson, a New Hampshire native who settled in Lowell, Mass., before the war. He served in the 6th Massachusetts Infantry when the regiment received orders to report to Washington, D.C., during the days following the rebel attack on Fort Sumter. Paul details Watson’s rise from a respected leader in Lowell to his leadership of the regiment as it journeyed through hostile mobs in Baltimore to sleeping in the U.S. Capitol and beyond. The story is illustrated with portraits of Watson and others. The honor includes a plaque and $250 cash award.

Another Military Images story was a finalist. Patrick Naughton’s “Case Number 16: A respected Delaware lieutenant’s experience offers insights into how commanders can treat honor and pride,” also appeared in our Spring 2021 issue.

Read the official press release.

Congratulations!

A New Mathew Brady Memorial

Historic Congressional Cemetery in Washington, D.C., the final resting place of Mathew Brady, will be home to a new memorial honoring the Father of Photojournalism. The Mathew Brady/Levin Handy Memorial is the culmination of the vision of Larry J. West, a collector of 19th century photography. The Smithsonian Institution acquired 286 items from West’s collection last year.

The new memorial will be adjacent to Mathew Brady’s burial plot at Historic Congressional Cemetery.

The new memorial is a unique interactive space featuring bronze statues of Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, and Brady’s camera. It also features more than 80 fired porcelain, artisanal Italian ceramic images, including a life-size ceramic of Brady. As Larry notes, the memorial honors Brady as a “pioneer photographer, technical innovator, entrepreneur, photo team leader and recorder of American history.”

It will be unveiled later this year.

For more information about the memorial and the dedication ceremony, contact BradyMemorial200@gmail.com.

Learn more about the origins and planning of the memorial in “The Camera Is the Eye of History”: A new memorial in Washington, D.C., honors Mathew Brady.

Finding Aid: Spring 2022

A complete table of contents for the Spring 2022 issue of Military Images magazine, and information about how to purchase single issues and subscriptions.

Vol. XL, No. 2
(80 pages)

Purchase print issue
Purchase PDF
Subscribe to MI

Explore the MI Archives:
Browse | Advanced search | Tutorial

Inside

Cover image
A postwar cabinet photograph from the Doug York Collection pictures photographer Mathew B. Brady.

Table of Contents (p. 1)

Editor’s Desk (p. 2)
In “Military Images and Gettysburg Publishing Tag Team a New Book,” the editor announces Gettysburg Faces: Portraits and Personal Accounts.

Mail Call (pp. 3-4)
Feedback includes requests for help finding images of the Richmond City Battalion, and for guidance on scanning cartes de visite.

Military Anthropologist (p. 4)
A survey of 867 cartes de visite reveals four ways photographers canceled revenue stamps affixed to images from 1864-1866.

Passing in Review (p. 6)
Book reviews: An Aide to Custer: The Civil War Letters of Lt. Edward G. Granger and Crosshairs on the Capital: Jubal Early’s Raid on Washington, D.C.

Photo Sleuth by Kurt Luther (pp. 8-10)
In “Making Civil War Photo Sleuth Identifications More Trustworthy,” Luther discusses DoubleCheck, a new verification feature.

Antebellum Warriors (p. 12)
Ambrotypes and albumens from the Paul Russinoff Collection feature West Pointer Henry Augustus Frederick Worth, 6th U.S. Infantry, and his wife, Mary.

Most Hallowed Ground (p. 14)
Ezra Westcote Clark, Jr., an officer in the 34th Ohio Infantry and staffer to Maj. Gen. Winfield Scott Hancock, went on to federal civil service in Alaska.

The Honored Few (p. 16)
Charles Amory Clark, 6th Maine Infantry, received the Medal of Honor for leading his command to safety at Brooks’ Ford during the Chancellorsville Campaign.

The Citizenry (p. 18)
Sarah Humphrey Bustill was connected to the Underground Railroad through her family, and to African American pioneer daguerreian Glenalvin Goodridge.

Fakes, Forgeries and Frauds by Perry M. Frohne (pp. 20-21)
Frohne’s “Fake Radar Contest” is a chance to test your knowledge of fake cartes de visite—and win a prize!

Brady 200: A forum (pp. 23-36)
To commemorate the bicentennial of Brady’s birth, we invited nine influential individuals—curators, collectors, and historians—to reflect on his relevance.

“Illustrations of Camp Life”: Thoughts on Mathew Brady’s overlooked early war series by Jeff L. Rosenheim (pp. 37-44)
Mathew Brady and his team of photographers produced an informal collection of outdoor portraits taken in and about the Defenses of Washington.

A Grand Gathering of Soldier Faces (pp. 46-51)
A survey of studio portraits of soldiers taken in the New York City and Washington, D.C., galleries of Mathew Brady.

Lincoln and Tad: A survey of images connected to Anthony Berger’s intimate portrait of a beleaguered wartime leader and his son by Chris Nelson (pp. 52-55)
A portrait of President Abraham Lincoln and his son Tad, taken on Feb. 9, 1864, became a staple in photo albums across the Union.

“The Camera Is the Eye of History”: A new memorial in Washington, D.C., honors Mathew Brady by Ronald S. Coddington (pp. 56-58)
Collector Larry West is spearheading a new memorial to honor Mathew Brady at Historic Congressional Cemetery in Washington, D.C.

“Living Shadows of the Passing Time”: Pioneer Arkansas photographer Thomas W. Bankes, his iconic image of the Sultana, and more by Gene Eric Salecker (pp. 60-65)
The story of Thomas W. Bankes, whose photo of the Sultana taken before it sunk with the loss of 1,200 lives ranks among the nation’s most memorable images.

A Collecting and Publishing Journey from the Civil War Centennial to Today—and the Future: Q&A with Ross J. Kelbaugh (pp. 66-69)
Ross Kelbaugh came of age in the 1950s when commemorations of the Civil War permeated popular culture—and launched him on an exciting journey of discovery.

Material Culture: Uniforms, equipment, weapons and related objects by Frederick C. Gaede (pp. 70-74)
Ponchos and waterproof blankets composed of rubber became the personal protection choice of many Union soldiers during the Civil War. Here’s the backstory.

Behind the Backdrop: Origins, artistry and photographers by Adam Ochs Fleischer (pp. 75-76)
In “Reflections on Two Years,” Fleischer looks back at previous columns and previews future plans.

Stragglers: Distinctive Images from MI contributors (p. 78)
Featured are two cavalry troopers who may have hailed from Texas or Mississippi.

The Last Shot (p. 80)
Saddler George H. McCoon of the 3rd Wisconsin Cavalry sits astride his horse at Carroll Plaza, once the parade ground of the original Fort Scott, Kan.

Top 20 Military Images stories in 2021

A look back at the most popular feature stories and columns in Military Images magazine in 2021. The list is based on the most viewed stories on Journal Storage, the non-profit company that preserved historically important journals.

Watch the reveal on YouTube:

Or, check out the list:

  1. Masculine Ideals in Civil War Photographs
    Austin Sundstrom
  2. They Knew Gettysburg Before the Battle
    Adams County Historical Society
  3. When Yellow Is Black and Blue Is White
    Elizabeth A. Topping
  4. New Hampshire Volunteers During the Civil War
    Dave Morin, Editor
  5. Investigating the Iconic Portraits of a USCT Drummer Boy
    Kurt Luther
  6. Uniforms of the Granite State
    Ron Field
  7. A Savior of the Capitol
    Paul Russinoff
  8. The Compact
    Ronald S. Coddington
  9. Lost an Arm in Freedom’s Fray: Union amputees after Gettysburg
    Charles T. Joyce
  10. Tracking Booth
    Richard A. Wolfe
  11. Participants in an Early Commemoration at Gettysburg’s National Cemetery?
    Elizabeth A. Topping
  12. Drummers
    Dale Niesen of The Image Collector, Chris Nelson, Editor
  13. From Vivid Eggplant to Unpleasant Cheesy Hues
    Ronald S. Coddington
  14. Military Anthropologist: Press coverage of Gettysburg and Vicksburg, May-November 1863
    Military Images
  15. Investigating the origins of three similar albums
    Kyle M. Stetz
  16. Morgan’s Lightning Strikes
    Dave Batalo, Ben Greenbaum
  17. Not a Forty-Eighter
    Daniel Carroll Toomey
  18. The Cambrian Oratress
    Richard L. Leisenring
  19. Early Uniforms of Duryee’s Zouaves, 1861
    Ron Field
  20. Green-Wood Cemetery
    Jeffrey I. Richman

Finding Aid: Winter 2022

A complete table of contents for the Winter 2022 issue of Military Images magazine, and information about how to purchase single issues and subscriptions.

Vol. XL, No. 1
(80 pages)

No print issues in stock
Purchase PDF
Subscribe to MI

Explore the MI Archives:
Browse | Advanced search | Tutorial

Inside

Cover image
A half plate ambrotype from the Dave Batalo Collection pictures Lt. Alexander Hamilton “Sandy” Rogers, an aide to Confederate Lt. Gen. Daniel H. Hill.

Table of Contents (p. 1)

Editor’s Desk (p. 2)
In “Showcasing the Artists Behind the Lens,” the editor recognizes the magazine’s commitment to documenting Civil War era photographers.

Mail Call (pp. 3-4)
Feedback includes comments by a new subscriber, additional information about two soldiers included in the last issue, and a tribute to the late Ken Bertholf.

Military Anthropologist (p. 4)
A chart tracks references to chasseur, hussar and zouave in U.S. newspapers from 1800-1875. Zouave skyrocketed in mentions following the Crimean War.

Passing in Review (p. 6)
Book reviews: Model 1841 Rifles and Their Confederate Bayonets by Thomas E. Singelyn; The Horse at Gettysburg: Prepared for the Day of Battle by Chris Bagley.

Photo Sleuth by Kurt Luther (pp. 8-11)
In “Reidentifying a Pennsylvania Cavalry Company,” Kurt Luther corrects an error introduced a century ago in Miller’s Photographic History of the Civil War.

Antebellum Warriors (p. 12)
A daguerreotype from the Dan Binder Collection features a militia soldier posed with a plumed bell crown shako. The image likely dates to the early 1850s.

Most Hallowed Ground (p. 14)
Cartes de visite of German immigrant Ludwig Philipp Seibert, a veteran Prussian cavalry officer who served on the staff of Union Brig. Gen. Charles C. Dodge.

The Honored Few (p. 16)
Private George Washington Walton of the 97th Pennsylvania Infantry received the Medal of Honor for rescuing a wounded comrade at Petersburg in 1864.

The Citizenry (p. 18)
The courtship of Susan “Sue” Tarleton of Alabama and Confederate Maj. Gen. Patrick R. Cleburne ended with a Union bullet at the 1864 Battle of Franklin.

Fakes, Forgeries and Frauds by Perry M. Frohne (pp. 20-21)
In “New Technology + New Equipment = Better Fakes,” Frohne examines a tintype made by a modern wet plate collodion photographer and sold as an original.

Rees of Richmond: A fresh look at the combative, competitive and brilliant photographer Charles Ricard Rees by Dominick A. Serrano (pp. 22-37)
Though Charles R. Rees is little remembered by history, his rose to become Richmond’s foremost photographer with a unique portrait style. This is his story.

The Pride of Washington County: A newly discovered composite honors the 19th Iowa Infantry’s Company C by Michael Huston (pp. 38-42)
A Civil War soldier portrait on eBay led to the discovery of a circa 1884 composite of surviving members of a company of mostly Iowa citizen soldiers.

A Red-Legged Devil Remembers a Revolt and Generous Brooklynites by Ronald S. Coddington, with artifacts from the Ken Fleming Collection (pp. 44-46)
Asa A. Holbrook of the 14th Brooklyn Infantry shared cherished memories of his Civil War service. His photograph, uniform coat and other relics survive.

“Shall We Sustain the Government?”: A sergeant’s open letter to fight for the Union by Ronald S. Coddington (pp. 48-51)
Charles W. Singer of the 107th U.S. Colored Infantry wrote an open letter encouraging Black men in blue to fight to save the Union and free enslaved people.

Lincoln Abroad: Views of President Abraham Lincoln from other countries by Chris Nelson (pp. 52-55)
A gallery of images produced in England, France, Germany, Italy, Peru and Russia show how citizens of other countries saw the 16th U.S. President.

A Field Guide to Union Hussars by Ron Field (pp. 58-64)
The distinctive hussar style was adopted by few military organizations before and during the Civil War. The best known unit is the 3rd New Jersey Cavalry.

Humanizing the “News from Our Brave Boys Down in Dixie”: Q&A with The Regimental Gazette Editor and Publisher Scott Valentine (pp. 66-68)
In the pre-digital era, Scott Valentine created a quarterly one-page publication to tell Union soldier stories and connect with fellow photo collectors.

Plate or Paper? Choosing the best format for a portrait photograph during the Civil War (p. 70)
A comparison of two primary choices for Civil War portraiture: hard plates (ambrotypes or tintypes) or albumen paper prints (cartes de visite).

Material Culture: Uniforms, equipment, weapons and related objects by Michael R. Cunningham, Ph.D. (pp. 71-73)
The Gray gutta percha knapsack, composed of two layers of unbleached cotton sandwiching a sheet of vulcanized gutta percha, was used during the Civil War.

Behind the Backdrop: Origins, artistry and photographers by Adam Ochs Fleischer (pp. 74-75)
In “The Palm Tree Backdrop of Jackson, Michigan,” Fleischer examines the distinctive painted canvases connected to photographer Norman Erastus Allen.

Stragglers: Distinctive Images from MI contributors (pp. 76-78)
Featured are brothers who served in Ohio regiments, a Confederate believed to be connected to the Trans-Mississippi Theater, an elite Knickerbocker, and more.

The Last Shot by Buck Zaidel (p. 80)
A Soldiers’ Photograph Album from the collection of the late Michael J. McAfee served as more than a container to hold images—it was a bridge to home.