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Military Images Nominated for National Writing Award

As an image-driven magazine, we strive to showcase, interpret and preserve unique and compelling Civil War era portraits. We also strive to put these images into context and historical perspective.

With this in mind, I am delighted to announce that two of our stories are finalists for the 2023 Army Historical Foundation Distinguished Writing Awards. They are:

“‘The Armless Hero of Fredericksburg’: The courage and compassion of Medal of Honor recipient Thomas Francis Plunkett,” which features images from the Mark Savolis Collection.

“Lieutenant Washington’s Fateful Encounter: James Barroll Washington sat for a well-known portrait with George Armstrong Custer. Here’s the story behind it.” by Ronald S. Coddington with an image from the Bobby McCoy Collection.

In 2021, we won in our category (Journals and Magazines) for “A Savior of the Capitol,” by Paul Russinoff.

Learn more about the Army Historical Foundation.

The Spring 2024 issue

A complete table of contents for the Spring 2024 issue of Military Images magazine, and information about how to purchase single issues and subscriptions.

Vol. XLII, No. 2
(80 pages)

Print edition: Visit our store to check availability
Digital edition: Visit JSTOR.org to purchase
Subscribe or renew your subscription

Explore the MI Archives:
Browse | Advanced search | Tutorial

Inside

Cover image
An ambrotype from the Liljenquist Family Collection at the Library of Congress features an unidentified Maryland Confederate.

Table of Contents (p. 1)

Editor’s Desk (p. 2)
Introducing a new column, Women of War by Melissa A. Winn, and a new stop (York, Pa.) for our traveling exhibit.

Mail Call (pp. 3-4)
Feedback includes more about Herb Peck Jr.’s stolen collection and praise for the magazine.

Military Anthropologist (p. 4)
When Did We Start Calling It the Civil War? A survey of names for the conflict between 1861 and 1865 on Newspapers.com reveals nomenclature changes over time.

Passing in Review (p. 6)
In Dear Uncles: The Civil War Letters of Arthur McKinstry, a Soldier in the Excelsior Brigade, Rick Barram tells the story of a young reporter-soldier.

Photo Sleuth by Kurt Luther (pp. 8-10)
Sharon Karam posted a question on the Facebook page Civil War Faces about an unnamed cadet photo, which led to a connection to the early days of Virginia Tech.

Antebellum Warriors (p. 12)
Scottish immigrants to the U.S. in the 19th century brought a rich military tradition, as evidenced by the uniform in this circa 1859 portrait of a militiaman.

Most Hallowed Ground (p. 16)
U.S. Army 1st Lt. Rufus Saxton nearly lost his life as he marched captured pro-secession militia through St. Louis. He went on to become a respected general.

The Honored Few (p. 18)
Major General Manning Ferguson Force called for a flag of truce to rally Union troops at the Battle of Atlanta. He got a truce flag instead. He was not happy.

The Citizenry (p. 20)
A circa 1871 photograph of a member of the Ku Klux Klan captured by U.S. law enforcement in Tishomingo County, Mississippi. The men turned state’s evidence.

Divided Maryland: Portraits and stories from the Jonathan Beasley Collection (pp. 23-41)
Representative portraits of the 60,000 Union and 25,000 Confederate soldiers and sailors who served in the U.S. and C.S. military forces during the Civil War.

King’s Knight to King 7 by Ron Maness (pp. 44–51)
Investigating connections between Confederate agent Caleb Huse in Europe, President Jefferson Davis and the James T. Ames Company during the Civil War.

Origins of Invalid Detachments and Invalid Corps by Bret Schweinfurth (pp. 53-55)
A series of War Department general orders issued between March and June 1863 trace the evolution of Invalid Detachments and the Invalid Corps.

Brooklyn Honors Its Boys In Blue: A history of the Brooklyn Service Medal by Richard Leisenring Jr. (pp. 56-60)
Brooklyn, New York, Mayor Alfred M. Wood championed one of the nation’s first service medals for Civil War veterans. The soldiers received the honor in 1866.

For the Sporting Man: A concise history of mail order erotica in the Civil War by Elizabeth A. Topping(pp. 62-65)
Mail order erotica tripled during the Civil War. In 1865 the government passed laws to seize and destroy pornographic photos and other images deemed obscene.

Material Culture by Ron Field (pp. 68-69)
The uniform of the First Light Infantry of Providence, R.I., dates to organization’s 1818 founding. Author Ron Field examines the dress and fatigue uniforms.

Behind the Backdrop by Adam Ochs Fleischer (p. 70)
The Caribbean Plantation Backdrop by Henry G. Pearce of Providence, R.I., features a unique scene that is open to thought-provoking interpretations.

Women of War by Melissa A. Winn (pp. 72-73) 
Civil War vivandière Marie Tepe, known as “French Mary,” suffered a wound at the Battle of Fredericksburg and received the Kearney Cross for Chancellorsville.

Vignette: Episodes of the Civil War by Scott Valentine (p. 74)
Captain George Emerson of the 67th Ohio Infantry suffered wounds at Fort Wagner in 1863 and Bermuda Hundred in 1864. The second proved mortal.

Stragglers (p. 76)
Confederate veteran and artist Allen Christian Redwood of the 1st Maryland Cavalry saw much of the Civil War, as reflected in his postwar illustrations.

The Last Shot (p. 80)
A carte de visite of a Veteran Reserve Corps first lieutenant covering the lower part of his face with a book.

New Column: Women of War by Melissa A. Winn

I am delighted to announce the debut of a new column: Women of War. It explores the life and service of women who served on the battlefield and homefront with patriotism and dedication equal to their male counterparts.

Taking on this mission is Melissa A. Winn. I’m thrilled to welcome her as a Senior Editor. Many of you are sure to recognize Melissa’s name from her career as a photographer and writer for Civil War Times, America’s Civil War, American History, and other publications. Nowadays, Melissa serves as the marketing manager for American Battlefield Trust, which does so much to preserve hallowed ground across the country. You might not know that Melissa collects Civil War photographs and ephemera with an emphasis on Dead Letter Office images and Maj. Gen. John A. Rawlins. Her passion for the Civil War and photography fuels her writing and research.

Melissa’s inaugural column features a woman who looms large in the telling of the Civil War: Marie “French Mary” Tepe, the vivandière of the 27th and 114th Pennsylvania infantries. Winn observes, “While 19th century social conventions constrained many American women to the homefront or hospitals during the Civil War, French immigrant Marie Tepe would not be obliged. Her feisty spirit drew her to the front lines from its start.” You can read the full column, “Daughter of the Regiment,” here.

Please join me in welcoming Melissa to our team, and Women of War to MI.

The Kenneth J. Bertholf Jr. Civil War History Education Program

I am pleased to announce our new program to provide free subscriptions for educational purposes to Civil War battlefields, historic sites, museums, and other organizations across the U.S.

The program began a few years ago with 10 sites, including Gettysburg and Vicksburg. We’ve expanded to include 50 locations today. We’re always looking to add more!

I need your help to fund this educational program. Your donation in any amount will help pay the annual cost of $24.95 per subscription. Visit our GoFundMe page to donate.

When the program was established, I reached out to longtime loyal subscribers for help. One of the first to step forward, Kenneth J. Bertholf Jr., had a true passion for Civil War history and collected artifacts related to the conflict. He became a generous supporter of getting the magazine into the hands of National Park employees and so many others on the frontlines of history. Ken died in 2021 at age 65, leaving behind his wonderful family, two books about the history of his hometown of Blairstown, N.J., and many friends.

Among those in attendance Ken’s memorial service were his friends Paul Denver and Don Carter. Paul shared this anecdote: “The latest issue of Military Images was prominently displayed next to pictures of his beloved collection. After his funeral, Don Carter and myself were speaking to his wife Bonnie who told us that she put that same issue in his casket for his journey home.”

This story will stay with me forever. It is fitting to remember Ken’s passion for collecting, his love of history, and his generous and kind nature by naming this program for him: The Kenneth J. Bertholf Jr. Civil War History Education Program.

I encourage you to help educate and raise awareness about the Civil War by giving to this worthy cause.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Program recipients:

  • Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum
  • Adams County Historical Society
  • African American Civil War Memorial Museum
  • Andersonville National Cemetery National POW Museum
  • Antietam National Battlefield
  • Arlington House, Robert E. Lee Memorial
  • Bentonville Battlefield
  • Boston African American 
  • Brice’s Cross Roads National Battlefield Site
  • Brice’s Crossroads Foundation
  • Cedar Creek & Belle Grove National Historical Park
  • Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park
  • Clara Barton National Historic Site
  • Columbus Belmont State Park
  • Confederate Memorial Hall Museum
  • Ford’s Theatre National Historic Site
  • Fort C.F. Smith Park
  • Fort Delaware State Park
  • Fort Fisher State Historic Site
  • Fort Pulaski National Monument
  • Fort Sumter National Monument
  • Frederick Douglass National Historic Site
  • Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park
  • General Grant National Memorial
  • Gettysburg National Military Park
  • Harpers Ferry National Historical Park
  • Henderson County Heritage Museum
  • James A. Garfield National Historic Site
  • Jefferson Davis Presidential Library
  • Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park
  • Library of Congress
  • Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial
  • Lincoln Memorial
  • Lomas Center Museum
  • Manassas National Battlefield Park
  • Mine Creek Civil War Battlefield
  • Monmouth County Historical Association
  • Monocacy National Battlefield
  • National Museum of the United States Army
  • National Portrait Gallery
  • Pea Ridge National Military Park
  • Petersburg National Battlefield
  • Richmond National Battlefield Park
  • Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Center
  • Shiloh National Military Park
  • Stones River National Battlefield
  • The American Civil War Museum
  • The Battle of Franklin Trust
  • Tupelo National Battlefield
  • U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center
  • Vicksburg National Military Park

Finding Aid: Winter 2024

A complete table of contents for the Winter 2024 issue of Military Images magazine, and information about how to purchase single issues and subscriptions.

Vol. XLII, No. 1
(80 pages)

Print edition: Visit our store to check availability
Digital edition: Visit JSTOR.org to purchase
Subscribe or renew your subscription

Explore the MI Archives:
Browse | Advanced search | Tutorial

Inside

Cover image
An ambrotype from the History Center of Mobile, Ala, pictures Raphael Semmes, circa 1854.

Table of Contents (p. 1)

Editor’s Desk (p. 2)
An update about the status of Herb Peck Jr.’s stolen collection from Bruce Jackson, the Peck Family agent and spokesperson.

Mail Call (pp. 3-4)
Feedback includes praise for the story about Herb Peck Jr.’s stolen collection.

Military Anthropologist (p. 4)
Since 1979, we’ve published 6,094 identified portraits of Union soldiers and sailors.

Passing in Review (pp. 6)
A book review of The Greatest Escape by Douglas Miller, published by Lyons Press.

Photo Sleuth by Kurt Luther (pp. 8-10)
A unusual backdrop painting of a broken cannon wheel with the name CULLY’s on it leads to South Carolina and the 33rd U.S. Colored Infantry.

Antebellum Warriors (p. 12)
A man dressed in civilian clothes wears military cross-belts consistent in style with Mexican War volunteers.

Most Hallowed Ground (p. 14)
John Lincoln Clem—Johnny Clem—is well known to students of the Civil War. An 1864 carte de visite portrait him includes an interview printed on the back.

The Honored Few (p. 16)
Brigadier General Alexander Shaler received the Medal of Honor for gallantry at the Second Battle of Fredericksburg for his charge at Marye’s Heights.

The Citizenry (p. 18)
On the back of a carte de visite portrait of an unidentified woman is a list of all the places this image traveled during the war—25 stops from Rhode Island to Georgia.

Semmes: An iconography of Rear Admiral Raphael Semmes, C.S. Navy by Cliff Krainik (pp. 20-34)
Feared by the North and beloved by the South as a commercial raider, labeled a pirate in the press, and twice a best-selling author, this is Semmes’ life in images.

The Likeness of Amos Humiston by Mark H. Dunkelman and Megan Kelley (pp. 36-39)
Two keepers of the history of Amos Humiston of the 154th New York Infantry and the children of the battlefield of Gettysburg are their perspectives.

First in War, First in Blood: Benjamin Franklin Kelley, West Virginia’s first military commander by Richard A. Wolfe (pp. 40-49)
Union Brig. Gen. Benjamin F. Kelley is remembered for his 1861 victory and his 1865 capture by partisan rangers. Here’s what happened in between.

Blessed Martyr, Vile Traitor: John Augustine Washington III, Mount Vernon’s last family owner and aide to Gen. Robert E. Lee by Ronald S. Coddington(pp. 52-62)
Forced with expensive upkeep and dwindling revenue, John A. Washington III sold Mount Vernon just before the Civil War and went on to join the Confederate army.

Material Culture by Mark Elrod (p. 64)
A look at early U.S. Model 1855 Harpers Ferry Rifles carried by Charles Smedberg of the 7th New York National Guard, and brother William of the National Rifles.

Behind the Backdrop by Adam Ochs Fleischer (pp. 66-69)
A tintype of Pennsylvania photographer William Kunstman posed with his unique background that includes a real cannonball is part of his story.

Stragglers (p. 72)
Two portraits of identified Confederates, one from Texas and another from Tennessee.

Vignette: Episodes of the Civil War by Scott Valentine (p. 74)
Captain Francis R. Leeds raised a company that became part of the 28th Connecticut Infantry. Eager to fight but sick with typhoid, he died before seeing action.

The Last Shot (p. 80)
A carte de visite of a sergeant of the 108th U.S. Colored Infantry holding the Stars and Stripes.

Finding Aid: Autumn 2023

A complete table of contents for the Autumn 2023 issue of Military Images magazine, and information about how to purchase single issues and subscriptions.

Vol. XLII, No. 4
(80 pages)

Print edition: Visit our store to check availability
Digital edition: Visit JSTOR.org to purchase
Subscribe or renew your subscription

Explore the MI Archives:
Browse | Advanced search | Tutorial

Inside

Cover image
A sixth-plate ambrotype from the late Herb Peck Jr. Collection pictures a Confederate soldier.

Table of Contents (p. 1)

Editor’s Desk (p. 2)
Announcing a new online resource of identified soldier, sailor, and other wartime images that have been published in Military Images magazine since 1979.

Mail Call (pp. 3-4)
Feedback includes praise for the “Jeff. Davis and the South!” Story in the last issue, identifying a field grade Iowa officer, and more.

Military Anthropologist (p. 4)
Since 1979, we’ve published 1,770 identified portraits of Confederate soldiers and sailors.

Passing in Review (p. 6)
A review of Groundbreakers: The History of the Northern Virginia Relic Hunters Association by Stephen W. Sylvia and Nancy Dearing Rossbacher.

Photo Sleuth by Kurt Luther (pp. 8-10)
Finding a portrait of 1st Lt. Presley Oldham Craig, the namesake of Fort Craig, one in a ring of 68 defensive forts surrounding wartime Washington, D.C.

Antebellum Warriors (p. 12)
A militia company lines up along a road in front of a house in Angelica, N.Y.

Most Hallowed Ground (p. 14)
Captain Sanford Cobb Kellogg served as an aide on the staff of his uncle, Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas.

The Honored Few (p. 16)
Francis Edwin “Frank” Brownell received the Medal of Honor for his role in the death of Col. Elmer E. Ellsworth of the 11th New York Infantry.

The Citizenry by Elizabeth A. Topping (p. 18)
Civil War era portraits of individuals posed with empty chairs memorialize the sitter. The empty chair evokes sorrow from viewers.

Fakes, Forgeries and Frauds by Perry M. Frohne(p. 20)
In this case study, Perry uses a blacklight to reveal a modern forgery of an Abraham Lincoln carte de visite.

Searching for Herb Peck’s Images: 45 years after the theft of his pre-eminent collection, an update—and a new call to action by Ronald S. Coddington (pp. 22-37)
In 1978, a break-in at collector Herb Peck’s Nashville home ended with the loss of prize images. The case went cold, then heated up. Here’s the latest.

Lieutenant Washington’s Fateful Encounter: James Barroll Washington sat for a well-known portrait with George Armstrong Custer. Here’s the story behind it. By Ronald S. Coddington (pp. 40-49)
The story behind one of the most recognizable images of the Civil War: Lieutenants George Armstrong Custer, James Barroll Washington, and an enslaved child. 

“The Brave Boy-Lieutenant”: First Lieutenant and Aide De Camp Frank N. Sheets by Brendan C. Hamilton (pp. 52-55)
Frank N. Sheets of the 29th Indiana Infantry proved a model aide to Brig. Gen. Richard W. Johnson until his death at the Battle of Chickamauga.

How to Live Your Best Life: A Civil War Veteran’s Advice to the Future by Ronald S. Coddington, featuring artifacts from the Eleanor Laughlin Family Papers (pp. 56-58)
Months before his death in 1920, Civil War veteran Capt. Henry Haymond wrote a poignant letter of advice to his young great-grandson.

“Hard Cases”: Distinguished European soldiers who did not become U.S. generals by Frank Jastrzembski (pp. 60-64)
This trio of military men—Garibaldi, Klapka, and Zerman—were high on the list for Union generals. But they did not get commissions. Here’s why.

Q&A with Rick Carlile: On Obsessive Collecting Genes, Passion for CDVs, and More (pp. 66-68)
Longtime contributor Rick Carlile shares his origin story as a collector of books, baseball cards, and Civil War photographs. It’s in the genes!

Material Culture by Anthony F. Gero (pp. 70-71)
The distinctive California militia uniform of 1864-1865 featured blue cuffs and collars.

Stragglers (pp. 72-75)
Portraits include a Pennsylvania Bucktail, soldiers and civilians at recruiting headquarters in Philadelphia, and a Confederate lieutenant.

Vignette: Episodes of the Civil War by Scott Valentine (p. 76)
Assistant Surgeon Benjamin Walter Carpenter served in the 2nd and 9th Vermont infantries, and also as chief medical officer at Camp Douglas in Chicago.

The Last Shot (p. 80)
A half-plate ambrotype picturing Company D of the 2nd Tennessee Cavalry (U.S.) posed outdoors with a variety of weapons.

Free Guide to Fakes, Forgeries and Frauds

Military Images is pleased to offer a free guide adapted from a compilation of columns, “Fakes, Forgeries and Frauds: Arming you with knowledge and tools to combat counterfeit images” by Perry M. Frohne.

The columns appeared between Autumn 2019 and Autumn 2023 in Military Images. The order of the columns has been changed, and some modifications have been made to the text, for this publication.

This guide is offered as a service to photograph collectors of all levels of experience with the goal of educating and raising awareness of fake images—and giving you the tools you need to detect them. These images, created with the intent to deceive, entered the marketplace as early as the 1980s. They will always be out there. The guide will give you confidence and practical knowledge to help you avoid costly mistakes.

Perry M. Frohne is the owner of Frohne’s Historic Military. He has been investigating fake images for more than 25 years. He is a MI Senior Editor. Contact Perry at perryfrohne@aol.com.

Finding Aid: Summer 2023

A complete table of contents for the Summer 2023 issue of Military Images magazine, and information about how to purchase single issues and subscriptions.

Vol. XLI, No. 3
(80 pages)

Print edition: Visit our store to check availability
Digital edition: Visit JSTOR.org to purchase
Subscribe or renew your subscription

Explore the MI Archives:
Browse | Advanced search | Tutorial

Inside

Cover image
A stereo card from the Wisconsin Historical Society pictures three Confederate prisoners at Gettysburg taken in July 1863 by Mathew Brady’s photographers.

Table of Contents (p. 1)

Editor’s Desk (p. 2)
Reflections on the value of curation is tied to a new book, America’s Defining Moment: Civil War Portraits from the Collections of Brian C. Boeve and Friends.

Mail Call (pp. 3-4)
Feedback includes praise for the “Jeff. Davis and the South!” Story in the last issue, identifying a field grade Iowa officer, and more.

Military Anthropologist (p. 4)
Today, we refer to the small paper prints that became all the rage during the Civil War as cartes de visite. Back then, Americans called them card photographs.

Passing in Review (pp. 6)
A review of Gettysburg’s Love Lost Story: The Ill-Fated Romance of General John Reynolds and Kate Hewitt by Jeffrey J. Harding.

Photo Sleuth by Kurt Luther (pp. 8-10)
Introducing Backdrop Explorer, a new Civil War Photo Sleuth feature that uses artificial intelligence to identify backgrounds.

Antebellum Warriors by Dr. Charles H. Cureton (pp. 12-13)
A portrait of a Marine is dated between 1856-1859 by investigating the details of his uniform and considering its photographic format.

Most Hallowed Ground (p. 14)
William A. MacNulty, 10th New York Infantry, suffered a wound and arm amputation at Fredericksburg in 1862. He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

The Honored Few (p. 16)
Julius H. Stahel, brigadier general and division commander, received the Medal of Honor for gallantry at the Battle of Piedmont in June 1864.

The Citizenry (p. 18)
A carte de visite of Martha Naomi Wilcox is inscribed by her to her father, John F. Wilcox, who went off to war in the ranks of the 116th New York Infantry.

Fakes, Forgeries and Frauds by Perry M. Frohne(p. 20)
One seller of fake cartes de visite made $7,406.19 during the first four months of 2023. This is a cautionary tale and reminder for collectors to be vigilant.

Three Confederate Prisoners at Gettysburg: Exploring the vast void of an iconic photograph by Paul Bolcik (pp. 23-31)
It is one of the most recognizable—and mysterious—photographs of the Civil War. A fresh look at this July 1863 image reveals what we know, and what we don’t.

A Place of Pilgrimage for the Nation: A photographic tour through Gettysburg’s Soldiers’ National Cemetery by Charles T. Joyce (pp. 32-51)
This 21-stop tour is designed for visitors to Gettysburg who seek to learn more about the Union soldiers who fought, died, and were buried there.

Relics From the Raising of the Flag at Sumter, 1865 by Ronald S. Coddington, featuring an artifact from the Glen Hayes Collection (pp. 54-56)
A display mounted to cardboard preserves remnants of leaves and flora from the 1865 flag raising ceremony over Fort Sumter, and two related cartes de visite.

Reunion Magic Brings Together Daguerreotypes of a Philadelphia Militia Officer by George S. Whiteley IV. (pp. 58-61)
A trio of portraits taken minutes apart by master photographer Marcus Aurelius Root of Philadelphia are reunited 175 years later. Here’s the story.

A Story Hidden Beneath a Beard by Marcy E. Zimmer (pp. 62-65)
Severely wounded in the face at the Battle of Dallas, Ga., in 1864, Maj. Ephraim C. Dawes of the 53rd Ohio Infantry, survived reconstructive surgery.

Material Culture by Ron Field (pp. 66-68)
B.F. Edmands designed a unique hat to protect soldiers from the elements. It, like other early war experimental headgear, did not catch on with the troops.

Behind the Backdrop by Adam Ochs Fleischer (p. 70)
Artificial Intelligence is already changing the world in myriad ways in its infancy. This includes identifying backdrops in Civil War photographs.

Stragglers (pp. 72-74)
Portraits include a Confederate lieutenant by Charles R. Rees and Capt. Warren Griffith of the 7th Virginia and 1st Maryland cavalries.

Vignette: Episodes of the Civil War by Scott Valentine (p. 76)
Thomas S. Thorp of the 23rd New York National Guard served in the Gettysburg Campaign. The experience left him emotionally scarred and ended in suicide.

The Last Shot (p. 80)
An 1899 view of the Vicksburg battlefield by photographer John C. Coovert pictures a man making a cash deal for relics gathered by local kids.

Finalists in the 2022 Army Historical Foundation Distinguished Writing Awards

I am delighted to announce that two Military Images stories have been recognized as finalists in the Journals and Magazine category of the Army Historical Foundation Distinguished Writing Awards. The annual competition honors books and articles published in 2022.

Please join me in recognizing and applauding:

“How They Went Forth to the Harvest of Death” by Charles T. Joyce is a concise account of the diehard U.S. Regulars at the Battle of Gettysburg, a story largely overlooked in the annals of the war. Chuck reveals the trials and tribulations they endured, and illustrates the story with images from his collection, which is focused on portraits of Gettysburg participants. The story appeared in our Summer 2022 issue.

“Birthplace of the American Zouave” by Ron Field traces the origins of Elmer Ephraim Ellsworth and how he fostered Zouave mania first in Chicago, Ill., and through the rest of America during his drill tour through the states in the summer of 1860. The account is illustrated with images from several collections. The story appeared in our Autumn 2022 issue.

Chuck and Ron are senior editors of and regular contributors to Military Images.

The Army Historical Foundation, a non-profit, tax-exempt organization, is dedicated to preserving the history and heritage of the American soldier. Its goal is to promote greater public appreciation for the contributions that America’s Army – Regular, Reserve, and National Guard – has made to the nation in 248 years of service. The Foundation is the principal fundraiser for the National Museum of the United States Army at Fort Belvoir, Va.

The competition is managed by Chief Historian Matthew J. Seelinger.

A New Limited Edition Book

This week I met at a local coffee shop with the printer to review proof pages for a forthcoming book by Brian Boeve, America’s Defining Moment: Civil War Portraits from the Collections of Brian C. Boeve and Friends. I am overjoyed with the superb quality and high production values, as you’ll see in the photos here. It will be a museum caliber heirloom coffee table book, hard bound with dust jacket. I could not be more pleased!

Details:

  • 8.5 x 11 inches
  • Hardbound with dust jacket
  • 270 pages
  • High quality paper and full color printing
  • Limited edition: 200 copies
  • Designed and printed by Military Images

Copies and will be available at the Gettysburg Show next month (June 24-26, 2023). Pre-orders are available in the Military Images store.