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Finding Aid: September/October 1997

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Vol. XIX, No. 2
(40 pages)

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Cover image
A sixth-plate ambrotype from an anonymous collector is a portrait of Solomon Moore of the 6th North Carolina Infantry.

Editor’s Desk (p. 3)
The editor shares comments about a portrait of a soldier thought to be concealing a chicken in his vest.

Mail Call (pp. 4-5)
Letters include nine comments, and the headline for each begins with “Not.”

Passing in Review (pp. 6-7)
Five publications are mentioned, including The Darkest Days of the War: The Battles for Iuka and Corinth (University of North Carolina Press) by Peter Cozzens, The World Will Long Remember: A Guide to the Battle of Gettysburg (White Mane) by Joanna McDonald, Mexican-American War 1846-48 (Brassey’s) by Ron Field and Lincoln’s Admiral: The Civil War Campaigns of David Farragut (Wiley & Sons) by James P. Duffy.

A.S. Morse’s Gallery of the Cumberland: A prolific photographer in the Western Theater by L.S. Kite (pp. 8-12)
A survey of 15 cartes de visite discovered in album and attributed to A.S. Morse includes an account of how the images came into the author’s possession, and a request to readers for any information about this camera operator.

Southern Faces: A Confederate gallery from the collections of our readers (pp. 13-19)
A survey of 25 portraits, primarily tintypes and ambrotypes, includes descriptive captions. Positively identified soldiers include Robert H. Batchelor of the 1stNorth Carolina Infantry, Daniel Slayton of the 38th Virginia Infantry, James West of Morgan’s Kentucky Squadron, John Brown Jr. of the 7th Florida Infantry, George E. Smith of the 44th Virginia Infantry, William Callaway of the 9th and 12th Louisiana Infantries, Robert Blount Rivers of the 42nd Alabama Infantry, John J. Rooks of the 15th Confederate Cavalry, William Watson Beard of the 16th Georgia Infantry, Washington Green Bohaning of the 5th Arkansas Infantry, Mark Lowrey of the 4th Mississippi Infantry, John Lyon of the 7th South Carolina Infantry, William Jenkins of the 1st North Carolina Junior Reserves (70th North Carolina Infantry), John and George Peden of the 6th Kentucky Infantry and Willis S. Roberts of the 4th Kentucky Infantry.

A Photograph of the C.S.S. Alabama…at Last by David M. Sullivan (pp. 20-21)
Tucked away in the files of the Tennessee State Library and Archives is the only known photograph of the famed commerce raider. The image was rediscovered by the author. His History of the Marine Corps in the Civil War was recently published.

“A Sickening, Heart-Rending Sight:” 6th Regiment North Carolina State Troops at the Battle of First Manassas by Greg Mast (pp. 22-28)
A detailed account of the regiment in the First Manassas Campaign is illustrated with eight portraits. They include Col. Charles Fisher, privates and brothers William Anderson Roberts and John L. Roberts, privates and brothers John D. Huskey and James Huskey, 2nd Lt. Quentin Thatch Anderson, Capt. Isaac Avery, Lt. William Preston Mangum and Pvt. Newton Branch.

My Darling Wife…Three letters from the colonel of the 15th Georgia edited by William Stier (pp. 29-32)
The letters from William Millican to his wife, Jane, date from the early period of the war: April 30 and Sept. 15, 1861, and May 29, 1862. Millican was killed in action during the Battle of Antietam.

The Auction Block (p. 33)
Latest auction news.

Cover story (p.34)
Details of the 6th North Carolina State Troops waist belt plate are discussed.

Uniforms & History by Michael J. McAfee (p. 35)
In “3rd Regiment, Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, Three Months Service, 1861,’We Marched to the Music of the Union,” McAfee explores the history and distinct gray uniforms of this regiment. The text is illustrated with a group portrait of three soldiers who served in its ranks, Alvin Vaugh, Levi P. Brown and Robert Parris.

Sutler’s Row (pp. 36-37)

Stragglers (pp. 38-40)
Solo photos from our readers includes a cigar-smoking woman in soldier’s dress and three men in gray who might be mistaken for Confederate soldiers.

Back cover
A cabinet card from the collection of Mark Gaynor pictures a young John J. Pershing as a first lieutenant in the 10th U.S. Cavalry, circa 1895.

Finding Aid: July/August 1997

The complete issue

Vol. XIX, No. 1
(40 pages)

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Inside

Cover image
carte de visite from the Paul Johnson Collection pictures a surgeon pretending to operate on the finger of a woman.

Editor’s Desk (p. 3)
The editor observes that the Gettysburg Show will be held in the new Sports Complex adjacent to the previous venue at the Eisenhower Inn and mentions the ongoing work of Seward Osborne regarding the 20th New York State Militia of Ulster County.

Mail Call (pp. 4-5)
Letters include praise for the Stametelos issue and feedback about heavy headgear.

Passing in Review (pp. 6-7)
Nine publications are mentioned, including Diary of a Yankee Engineer (Fordham University Press) edited by Anita Palladino, A Yankee Spy in Richmond, the Civil War Diary of “Crazy Bet” Van Lew (Stackpole Books) edited by David D. Ryan, Civil War Battlefields and Landmarks: A Guide to National Park Sites (Random House) edited by Frank E. Vandiver, Julian Scott, Artist of the Civil War and Native America (McFarland & Company) by Robert Titterton and more.

Gettysburg ’96: A selection of images seen at last year’s Gettysburg Show (pp. 8-16)
A selection of 31 images includes a wide variety of portraits. On one end is a 1930 photo of bikini-clad woman standing with their rifles and the other end is the navy’s Benjamin Horton Porter, an up-and-coming officer killed in action at Fort Fisher, N.C., on Jan. 15, 1865.

Palmetto Soldiers on the Fields of the West: 10th & 19th South Carolina Infantry in the Army of Tennessee by John Mills Bigham (pp. 17-19)
A brief summary of the South Carolinians is illustrated with portraits of Calvin Foxworth, John S. Palmer and his wife, Alice, James F. Carraway, Moses Norris Holstein and the battle flag of the 10th.

The “Forgotten” Fifteenth Infantry: Service in China, 1912-1938 by Richard S. Faulkner (pp. 20-23)
In January 1912, the War Department ordered a battalion of the 15th U.S. Infantry to move from the Philippines to China to quell threats to American civilians and interests. The number of soldiers soon increased. No one imagined the deployment would last 26 years. The text is illustrated with six related images of the regiment.

The Grim Face of War: A somber album from the collections of our readers (pp. 24-29)
A survey of amputees and other men disfigured from wounds suffered during the Civil War features 15 men. They include Richard D. Dunphy of the Hartford, a blinded soldier, Alfred A. Stratton of the 147th New York Infantry, Charles Kramer of the 6th Pennsylvania Reserves, Walter F. Halleck of the 11th Michigan Infantry, Charles Dunn of the 5th Michigan Cavalry, Lewis Martin of the 29th U.S. Colored Infantry, George Carr of the 30th U.S. Colored Infantry, Neal Wicks of the 4th U.S. Colored Infantry, Oliver Scott of the 30th U.S. Colored Infantry, Charles Harris of the 31st U.S. Colored Infantry, Sidney M. Ballard of the 39th North Carolina Infantry and William McNulty of the 10th New York Infantry.

Early American Machine Guns: Photo postcards from the collection of Herb Peck Jr. (pp. 30-31)
Six images show the Colt Models 1895 and 1909 and the .30/06 Lewis machine guns ion military settings.

Light & Shadow (p. 32)
Longtime contributor Karl Sundstrom spotted a fake Civil War carte de visite at a collector’s show in Nashville, Tenn., and offered his thoughts about the image and those who would produce them with intent to defraud.

Uniforms & History by Michael J. McAfee (p. 33)
In “47th Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry, ‘The Washington Grays,’” McAfee explores the history and uniforms of this hybrid Zouave regiment. The text is illustrated with a portrait of an enlisted man who wears the regiment’s unique armband.

The Auction Block (p. 34)
Latest auction news.

Sutler’s Row (pp. 35-37)

Captain Bob’s Caveat Emptorium (p.37)
The Captain has a super rare naval Zouave image to sell you!

Stragglers (pp. 38-40)
Solo photos from our readers includes a portrait believed to be Philip Sheridan, a circa 1895navy band, a quarter-plate tintype believed to be a scene of Fort Donelson, Tenn., and World War I hero Alvin York.

Back cover
An image from the Dent “Wildman” Myers Collection is a portrait of a Confederate soldier with a huge side knife.

Finding Aid: November/December 1996

The complete issue

Vol. XVIII, No. 3
(40 pages)

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Inside

Cover image
carte de visite from the Seward Osborne Collection pictures soldiers from Company D of the 29th New York Infantry.

Editor’s Desk (p. 3)
The editor takes issue with a reader who wrote to complain that casualties have been overemphasized in the magazine. He also notes that Military Images now has email: milimage@csrlink.net.

Mail Call (pp. 4-5)
Letters include details about the September/October 1996 cover, an issue with the identification of a vessel as the Kearsarge and praise for the recent Gettysburg issue.

Passing in Review (pp. 6-7)
Eight publications are mentioned, including Red Diamond Regiment (White Mane Press) by William B. Jordan, Conquering the Valley: Stonewall Jackson at Port Republic (William Morrow & Co.) by Robert K. Krick, Grant’s Canal (White Mane Press) by David F. Bastion, American Military Belt Plates (O’Donnell Publications) by Michael O’Donnell and J. Duncan Campbell and more.

Armed Camps & Grecian Urns: More Painted Backdrops in Civil War Photography (pp. 8-19)
A survey of 50 Civil War portrait photographs of soldiers and sailors includes an array of military and non-military back drops.

Uncommon Cavalrymen: Vignettes of Mounted Men from the Civil War Era (pp. 20-26)
A total of nine troopers are featured, including Samuel H. Painter of the 1st Michigan Cavalry, Llewellyn G. Estes of the 1st Maine Cavalry, George H. Harbaugh of Breathed’s Virginia Battery, Stuart’s Horse Artillery, C. Milton Parkins of the 1st and 15th Virginia Cavalries, John S. Perry of the 2nd Florida Cavalry, Daniel Henry Chamberlain of the 5th Massachusetts Cavalry, Francis S. Davidson of the 5th Massachusetts Cavalry, William Unversagt of the 4th Pennsylvania Cavalry and William H. Stock of the 17th Illinois Cavalry.

The Forgotten Thirty-Fourth: New Jersey’s 34th Infantry in the Civil War by William Goble (pp. 27-31)
The Jerseymen who served in this regiment labored behind the scenes, fighting guerillas in Mississippi and other areas in the South, with little fanfare. This history of the regiment is illustrated with portraits of Lt. Col. Timothy C. Moore, 1st Lt. John Schwartz, Hospital Steward Hiram J. Noyes, 1st Lt. Augustus Grobler, Capt. Martin L. Haines, Capt. Henry Reed, 1st Lt. Charles Seamen and 2nd Lt. Jonas Gilson.

Uniforms & History by Michael J. McAfee (pp.32-33)
In “Les Enfants Perdus: The “Lost Children” of the Independent Battalion, New York Volunteer Infantry, 1862-1864,” McAfee explores the history and uniforms of this regiment of bastard children. The text is illustrated with portraits of an unidentified officer and an enlisted man, and an outdoor image of men in Yorktown, Va.

Captain Bob’s Caveat Emptorium (p.35)
The Captain is at it again! This time, he’s trying to pass off a view of a dead man as an Antietam battlefield casualty taken by Mathew Brady.

The Auction Block (pp. 36-37)
Latest auction news.

Stragglers (p. 38)
Solo photos from the collections of our readers include two outdoor views of Company A of the 50th Illinois Infantry and another group who may be Rhode Islanders.

Sutler’s Row (pp. 39-40)

Back cover
A real photo postcard from the Alan Leach Collection is a portrait of a lieutenant who wears a rare aerial badge, the “Fighting Observer” wings.

Finding Aid: March/April 1996

The complete issue

Vol. XVII, No. 5
(40 pages)

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Inside

Cover image
A print from the Guy Smith Collection is a portrait of a sailor from the Constellation in the early days of the battlefield navy, circa 1890s.

Editor’s Desk (p. 3)
The editor mentions a number of books that have been published, and are soon to be published, by contributing editors.

Mail Call (pp. 4-5)
Letters include praise for the “Piedmont Battle Shirts” story and positive comments on others, including a thank you from one subscriber for including Bible quotes.

Passing in Review (pp. 6-7)
Five publications are mentioned, including Nowhere to Run: The Wilderness, May 4th & 5th, 1864 (White Mane Publishing) by John Michael Priest, Blood and Sacrifice: The Civil War Journal of a Confederate Soldier (Blue Acorn Press) by William Pitt Chambers, Black Southerners in Gray (Southern Heritage Press) by Richard Rollins, Longstreet’s Aide: The Civil War Letters of Major Thomas J. Goree (University Press of Virginia) and more.

Uncommon Soldiers: Vignettes from both sides of the Mason-Dixon Line by Hartman McIntosh (pp. 8-16)
A selection of profiles includes William G.B. Hosch of the Confederate Marine Corps, Levi Bolton of the 51st Pennsylvania Infantry, Isaac Marks of the 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry, William Jasper Bunn of the 14th Alabama Infantry, Silas Mattison Bunn of the 62nd Alabama Infantry, James Henry Hearn of the 2nd and 46th Alabama Infantries, Van Garren, a colored servant in Brackett’s Battalion of Minnesota Cavalry, James Franklin Fitts of the 10th New York Cavalry and the 114th New York Infantry, John David Myers of the 3rd South Carolina Infantry, R.C. Morgan of the 2nd Kentucky Cavalry, Henry A. and James Pink Collins of the 49th North Carolina Infantry, Jonathan T. Kimmel of the 30th Illinois Infantry, Sydney & Edson Demarest of the 85th Ohio Infantry, Adam Rapp of the 3rd Infantry, Maryland Potomac Home Brigade and the 14th and 11th U.S. Infantries, and James Ausban Martin of the 53rd North Carolina Infantry.

Contributions to the Cause: One Family’s Participation in the Civil War by Robert Kelley (pp. 17-19)
The author’s great-great-grandfather, William L. Ingram, served in the 14th Virginia Cavalry. This trooper is one of several relatives of the author who participated in the war, and each is recognized with a brief profile. Some are illustrated with a portrait of the subject.

The Grand Illusion: Painted Backdrops in Civil War Photography (pp. 20-29)
A survey of 34 Union and Confederate portraits reveals a variety of military and non-military canvases.

The Mystery of the Mann Accouterments: Where have all the boxes gone? by John Kuhl (pp. 30-32)
The unusual leather cartridge boxes developed and produced by William D’Alton Mann are rarely seen. The author explores this unique piece of equipment.

Light and Shadow (p. 33)
In this reprint from the Daguerreian Society Newsletter, Matthew Isenburg discusses the daguerreotype and the digital image.

Stragglers (pp. 34-35)
Images submitted by readers include the “Jackass Battery,” images of Frank Benner, 118th Illinois Infantry, and the hospital in which he died, and a Confederate infantryman posed in front of a dark blanket.

The Auction Block (pp. 36-37)
Latest auction news.

Sutlers’ Row (pp. 38-40)

Back cover
An albumen print from the David W. Vaughan collection pictures a Union sailor with embroidered cuffs.

Finding Aid: January/February 1996

The complete issue

Vol. XVII, No. 4
(40 pages)

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Cover image
An albumen print, from General Sweeney’s Museum in Republic, Mo., pictures Capt. Emmitt MacDonald of the St. Louis Battery, Missouri State Guard, in 1861.

Editor’s Desk (p. 3)
In this, our 100th issue, the editor responds to a question about how many cartes de visite were produced during the Civil War. The estimate: 17.5 million. To date, Military Images has published 6,168 images, and at this rate could publish the magazine for another 9,383 years—only 56,298 more issues to go! The text is illustrated with an Indiana soldier who has his regimental number, 100, sewn to his uniform coat.

Mail Call (p. 5)
Letters include praise for the magazine on its 100th issue.

Light and Shadow (p. 7)
The subject of this column is how to copy daguerreotypes.

Dating the Regulars: An Essay on Antebellum Images by Dr. Charles Cureton and Dr. Bill Schultz (pp. 8-11)
A selection of 5 images illustrates a collection of tips and other insider knowledge that may be used to identify pre-Civil War military portraits. Two images are identified, William Root of the 5th U.S. Infantry and Dabney Maury of the Mounted Rifles.

“Sorrow Hangs as a Shroud:” The Irish Brigade at Fredericksburg by Joseph G. Bilby (pp. 12-15)
A brief history of this celebrated brigade is illustrated by seven of its members: Brig. Gen. Thomas Meagher, Col. Robert Nugent, Maj. James Cavanaugh and Capt. John Donovan of the 69th New York Infantry, Capt. John Dwyer of the 63rd New York Infantry and Col. Richard Byrnes of the 28th Massachusetts Infantry.

One Yank, One Reb by Thomas P. Lowry, M.D., and Greg Mast (pp. 16-17)
Vignettes of two soldiers, Michael Lowry of the 10th Pennsylvania Reserves and Nelson Monroe Sherrill of the 1st North Carolina Infantry.

Confederate Studio Portraits by Gettysburg Photographers by William Frassanito (pp. 18-19)
This adaptation of the author’s new book, Early Photography at Gettysburg, is illustrated with portraits of two surgeons, Frank Patterson of Barksdale’s Mississippi Brigade and John Hayes of the 26th Alabama Infantry.

Military Imagery: An album of Feds, Rebs, Doughboys & Continentals contributed by our readers for the 100th issue of the magazine (pp. 20-33)
A total of 49 portraits spanning 75 years of American military history are featured. All branches of the military, and both men and women, are represented.

Uniforms & History by Michael J. McAfee (pp. 34-36)
In “Irregular Regulars,” McAfee explores the diversity of uniform styles. Eleven images illustrate the text, including generals Winfield Scott and John Dix, P. Delmedge of the 4th U.S. Artillery and Ahrens of Battery A, 2nd U.S. Artillery.

Stragglers (p. 37)
A lone image of a sailor in his summer whites.

The Auction Block (p.38)
Latest auction news.

Sutlers’ Row (pp. 39-40)

Back cover
A sixth-plate ambrotype from the Richard Tibbals Collection is a portrait of an unknown soldier dressed in French chasseur uniform.

Finding Aid: November/December 1995

The complete issue

Vol. XVII, No. 3
(40 pages)

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Inside

Cover image
A cabinet card from the Marion Pliner Collection at the U.S. Army Military History Institute pictures trumpeter Ellis Pugh of Philadelphia’s 1st City Troop.

Editor’s Desk (p. 3)
The editor notes that he is touring Civil War Round Tables with a Civil War photography presentation, and introduces two new departments, The Auction Block and Light and Shadow.

Mail Call (p. 5)
Letters include comments about “Midwestern Masterpieces” and other stories, including a note from a woman who lived in the same house as one of the Confederates pictured in the recent “Uncommon Soldiers” gallery.

Passing in Review (pp. 6-7)
Six publications are mentioned, including Battle Flags of Texans in the Confederacy (Eakin Press) by Alan K. Sumrall, Partners in Command: The Relationships Between Leaders in the Civil War (The Free Press) by Joseph T. Glatthaar, Rebel Private: Front and Rear (Dutton), by William Fletcher, Remember Fontenoy! The 69th New York and the Irish Brigade in the Civil War (Longstreet House) by Joseph G. Bilby and more.

Light and Shadow (p. 8)
“What’s the best way to copy my collection so I can send some prints to MI?” and two other questions are answered in this inaugural department.

Piedmont Battle Shirts: Militia Uniforms of Central Virginia, 1859-1863 by Rusty Hicks and Adam Scher (pp. 9-15)
A selection of 17 images picture soldiers from the Lynchburg, Va., clad in battle shirts. Identified soldiers include Silas Booth, Christopher Baker Clark, Edward Sanford Gregory, William James Bowling, William Henry Taylor, Stephen Stewart, Marion Seay and Thomas B. Horton of the 11th Infantry, James Henry Woodson of the 2nd Virginia Cavalry, Jones McCanna of the Lynchburg Artillery, Andrew Jackson Lawson of the 21st Infantry, and Murray F. Taylor and Richard H.T. Adams of the staff of Gen. A.P. Hill.

All the Lofty Instruments of War: An album of Musician Images from the Civil War (pp. 16-19)
A total of 14 images of drummers and horn players are featured. Identified musicians include Solomon Foster, Jonathan Wilson and John Pittwood of the 1st Michigan Engineers & Mechanics Regiment, Robert Crossley, John Fitzgerald of the 6th Michigan Cavalry and Lewis Wentz.

Military Airs & Graces: A photographic essay on regular, militia & national guard musicians, 1860-1919 by Anthony Gero (pp. 21-26)
A total of 16 images explore the variety of uniforms and instruments over this 60-year period. Images include Union soldier Frederick L. Wood of the 11th New York Cavalry, Buglers of the 1st Vermont Infantry from 1898, a U.S. navy band circa 1902-1910, the Trumpet, Fife & Drum Corps of the 30th Infantry, circa 1902-1910.

Bugler of the 1st Minnesota: The life of Ernst Meyer by Roger Norland (pp. 27,37)
German-born Meyer (1827-1896) suffered the loss of his bugle when it was shot from his hands during the First Battle of Bull Run.

Uniforms & History by Michael J. McAfee (pp. 28-29)
In “Musicians of the Tenth Legion,56th regt., New York Volunteers,” McAfee explores the band of the regiment and its distinctive uniform. Two unidentified musicians illustrate the text.

A Fond Farewell: The last ride of Chenoweth’s Partisan Rangers by John Sickles (pp. 30-32)
A history of exiled Kentuckians commanded by Col. James Q. Chenoweth details their services from mid-1864 into 1865. The text is illustrated with portraits of Chenoweth and his nemesis, Union Gen. Edward McCook.

The Auction Block (p.33)
Inaugural department features latest auction news.

Name That Nationality! (pp. 34-35)
A quiz includes multiple choice questions for seven military portraits.

Captain Bob’s Caveat Emptorium (p.37)
In this column, the wily Captain attempts to sell us a navy officer wearing a special medal to commemorate the sinking of the Merrymac. But buyer beware! The subject is actually a Civil War era policeman.

Sutlers’ Row (pp. 38-40)

Back cover
A circa 1855 daguerreotype from the Norman Bellows Collection pictures an unknown fifer in Company A, 50th New York State Militia.

Finding Aid: September/October 1995

The complete issue

Vol. XVII, No. 2
(40 pages)

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Inside

Cover image
A portrait from the collection of anonymous collector pictures Thomas Holeman Jr. of the 13th Tennessee Infantry.

Editor’s Desk (p. 3)
The editor notes that the new year will mark the 100th issue of the magazine. He promises a very special issue to celebrate this milestone.

Mail Call (p. 5)
Letters include an 1869 General Order that does not permit photographic views of regular forts, Louisianans in tricorn hats and praise for “Midwestern Masterpieces.”

Passing in Review (pp. 6-8)
Eight publications are mentioned, including The Civil War Reminiscences of Major Silas T. Grisamore, CSA (LSU Press) edited by Arthur W. Bergeron, Our Campaigns (Burd Street Press) by Stanley Zamonski, Broken Fortunes (South Carolina Historical Society) by Randolph W. Kirkland Jr., Landscapes of the Civil War: Newly Discovered Photographs from the Medford Historical Society (Alfred A. Knopf) edited by Constance Sullivan and more.

The Man Who Could Be King: Lt. Colonel James Henry Rion, C.S.A. by James A. Gabel (pp. 9-11)
Canadian-born Rion moved to Georgia at a young age and went on to serve in the 25th South Carolina Militia before the war, and, after hostilities began, he served in several Palmetto State organizations. The text is illustrated with two portraits of Rion.

Southern Faces: Soldier portraits from the collections of our readers (pp. 12-19)
A total of 35 images of various formats include a few identified men. They include Robert Anderson of Hanover County, Va., Jefferson and Madison Strickland of the 14th Alabama Infantry, William Favor of the 7th Georgia Infantry, John Thomas Dixson of the 56th Virginia Infantry, Matthew M. Gaines of the 22nd Alabama Infantry, Col. John Marshall of the 4th Texas Infantry, Col. Arnold Elzey of the 1st Maryland Infantry, Lt. John Pegram and Willie Pegram, Gen. George Washington Gordon and James Lott Lowman of the 20th South Carolina Infantry.

Soldiers of the Cause: Brief biographies from the Old Confederacy by Robert Fulmer (pp. 20-26)
A dozen profiles, each illustrated with a portrait, include Mott M. Lindsay of the 19th Mississippi Infantry, Washington L. Watkins of the 8th Missouri Cavalry, Mess No. 3 of the 1st Maryland Cavalry (George C. Jenkins, William and Edmund Clarence Neal, Dan Emory, James McCourt, Lafayette House and Robert Miles), Abner Joel Yancey of the 39th Georgia Infantry, William Mordecai Davidson of the 5th Tennessee Infantry, William Henry Witcher of the 3rd Battalion Georgia Sharpshooters, John H. Adams of the 2nd Georgia Cavalry, James Ambler Griffin of the 4th South Carolina Infantry and the 37th Battalion Virginia Cavalry, Dilmus Jarrett of the 18th Georgia Infantry, George H. Markell Jr. of the 4th Virginia Cavalry, Solomon McLean of the 23rd North Carolina Infantry and Leroy Augustus Stafford of the 9th Louisiana Infantry.

An Interview with Greg Mast, Author of State Troops and Volunteers: A Photographic Record of North Carolina’s Civil War Soldiers (pp. 27-32)
An interview with Mast is illustrated by six portraits of North Carolinians. Identified soldiers include George Burns Bullock of the 23rd Infantry, William F. Faucette of the 13th Infantry, possibly Henry Mowbray of Hill’s Battalion Senior Reserves, William May of the 72nd Infantry, Bryan Cobb of the 2nd Infantry and Joseph Higdon of the 1st Cavalry.

Uniforms & History by Michael J. McAfee (p. 33)
In “Confederates in Gray in Yankeedom,” McAfee discusses the large number of soldiers, including Capt. Harry Gilmor of the 12th Virginia Cavalry, pictured here, who were in the North. Some wandered the streets, others were prisoners of war, and all were Southern loyalists.

Captain Bob’s Caveat Emptorium (p.37)
In this column, the ole’ Captain attempts to sell us a Confederate naval officer who is actually a Canadian national.

Stragglers (pp. 36-37)
Four images include Daniel Whitener of 35th North Carolina Infantry, a military tableau in memory of Jefferson Davis, Jefferson Shields, a servant to Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson and an image of two Confederate flags by a Lynchburg photographer.

Sutlers’ Row (pp. 39-40)

Back cover
A tintype from the collections of the U.S. Army Military History Institute pictures 3rd Lt. James C. Bates of the 9th Texas Cavalry.

Finding Aid: July/August 1995

The complete issue

Vol. XVII, No. 1
(40 pages)

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Inside

Cover image
A carte de visite from the Colby Mack collection pictures a horse-drawn carriage with three men, one of which appears to be a convalescing Union soldier.

Editor’s Desk (p. 3)
The editor laments the rising cost of antique military images in the U.S., and notes that there are bargains to be found in Europe.

Mail Call (p. 5)
Letters include critical comments about “Brown the Poet” (May-June 1995) being too far afield for a magazine about military photography, and that no Confederate images were included in the same issue.

Passing in Review (p. 7)
Four publications are mentioned, including Bicycling Through Civil War History in Maryland, West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Virginia (EPM Publications) by Kurt B. Detwiler, Flashman and the Angel of the Lord (Alfred A. Knopf) by George MacDonald Fraser and Who Wore What? Women’s Wear 1861-1865 (Thomas Publications) by Juanita Leisch.

The Rock River Rifles: Company I, 34th Illinois Volunteer Infantry by Scott Cross (pp. 8-9)
A brief history of the company, which fought at Shiloh, Stone’s River, and the Atlanta and Carolinas campaigns, is illustrated with portraits of six members. They include Amos Hostetter, Theophilus Hills, Mason Fuller, Joseph Teeter, Israel Solt and Frederick Ikerman.

A Winter in New Bern: Family visits brighten a season of provost duty in an occupied city of the South by David A. Norris (pp. 10-12)
This photo analysis is focused on two photographs from the MOLLUS collection at the U.S. Army Military History Institute in Carlisle Barracks, Pa. One pictures a group of officers and ladies posed on the porch of a frame home. Another is Union Maj. Gen. John G. Foster and his staff standing in front of headquarters of the Department of North Carolina.

Midwestern Masterpieces: Images from the collection of Donald Bates (pp. 13-19)
An interview with Bates is illustrated by 23 portraits. All are hard plate formats and none are identified.

The Lucky Company: Co. A, 95th Ohio Infantry by Coby Mack (pp. 20-21)
A summary of the company’s service, including the Vicksburg Campaign, is illustrated with 14 gem-sized tintypes, 13 of which are identified. They include David Evans, Henry Schrock, William Davies, Sylvester Gale, Eli Dennison, Evan Evans, Jonah Whitaker, George Schrock, Frederick Weadon, William Walton, Smith Dulin, Edward Ulric and Josiah Landis.

Uncommon Soldiers: Vignettes from the Brothers’ War (pp. 22-31)
A collection of images and profiles include the following soldiers: John R. Beatty of the 2nd Minnesota Infantry, John Emanuel Ayers of the 58th Virginia Infantry, Clarence Mauck of the 4th U.S. Cavalry and Edwin Mauck of the 6th U.S. Cavalry, Abner Charles Lay of the 13th Georgia Infantry, Cornelius Starr Thomasson of the 6th Alabama Infantry, John Cuthbert Carroll of the 15th Kentucky Infantry and the 14th and 32nd U.S. Infantries, Frederick William Bush of the 1st Arkansas Infantry, Arthur Cranston of the 7th and 55th Ohio Infantries and the 4th U.S. Artillery, Samuel Alfred Craig of the 105th Pennsylvania Infantry and John Henry Hatfield of the 4th Mississippi Cavalry Battalion and the 8th Confederate Cavalry.

Uniforms & History by Michael J. McAfee (p. 33)
In “Turncoats: Regulars who went South in 1861,” McAfee discusses the large number of soldiers, including Robert E. Lee and others, who joined the Confederate army. The text is illustrated with a circa 1861 carte de visite of Pierre G.T. Beauregard.

Stragglers (pp. 34-35)
The theme of this grouping of five images is “oddball insignia.” Included is a navy paymaster, a possible chaplain, a hospital steward and a post-Civil War Marine.

Captain Bob’s Caveat Emptorium (p.37)
In this column, the slick Captain attempts to convince us that a modern view of Brian Pohanka’s 5th New York Zouaves is an original photo to the Civil War period.

Sutlers’ Row (pp. 38-40)

Back cover
A continuation of the cover image.

Finding Aid: May/June 1995

The complete issue

Vol. XVI, No. 6
(40 pages)

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Inside

Cover image
Since the magazine was founded in 1979, Mark Supplee’s portrait has appeared on our letterhead and business cards. Here at last he receives due recognition.

Editor’s Desk (p. 3)
The editor previews projects in development, including an all-Confederate issue, Tennessee Confederates, and notes a display of women’s fashions from the Civil War period.

Mail Call (pp. 4-5)
Letters include commentary on the use of the term kepi to describe a cap, the identification of soldiers pictured in an image as members of Elmer E. Ellsworth’s United States Zouave Cadets, and praise for the recent story about American Hussars.

Lieutenant Mark Supplee, 51st Pennsylvania Infantry: The story behind a well-known face by Harry Roach (p. 7)
Supplee started his enlistment in the regiment as an orderly sergeant, advanced to second lieutenant and suffered a foot wound at the Battle of Fredericksburg that eventually ended his service. He lived until 1901. Supplee’s portrait illustrates the text.

Rank & File: An album of images from our readers (pp. 8-16)
This gallery of 37 images is a potpourri of subjects that range from a double exposure of Chaplain Thomas Murphy of the 1st Delaware Infantry to unique medals and badges, casualties of war, navy men and more.

Brown the Poet by Mark Dunkelman (pp. 17-19)
Sergeant James Byron Brown of the 154th New York Infantry wrote at least three patriotic poems that were published. Brown survived the war but his whereabouts after he was discharged for disability in July 1864 are not known. Brown’s portrait illustrates the text.

Murder in Dayton, Death of George Waterman: Copperheads slay lieutenant of the 115th Ohio by Timothy Brookes (pp. 20-22)
George Lawson Waterman, a promising young officer, was ordered to quell Copperhead rowdies in Dayton in May 1863. Months later, in September, Waterman was on duty in Dayton when his was shot in the thigh by one of the rowdies. The wound proved fatal. A wartime image of Waterman, posed with fellow Lt. John Eadie, and a modern photograph of Waterman’s grave stone illustrate the text.

A Look at the Other Side: Carte de visite backmarks of the Civil War era by Tom LaPorte (pp. 23-25)
Eagles and the personification of Liberty are two of the motifs explored in this overview of photographer’s imprints. A total of 14 images illustrate the text.

Mystery Zouaves: Unknown soldiers in baggy pants by Robert Fulmer (pp. 26-29)
A total of 14 images include infantrymen of the 14th Brooklyn, 114th Pennsylvania (Collis’s Zouaves) and other regiments across the Union.

Uniforms & History by Michael J. McAfee (pp. 30-31)
In “Company A, 10th Regiment, National Guard, State of New York—The Albany Zouave Cadets, 1861-1865,” McAfee provides details about the uniform and history of this regiment of the company. Two cartes de visite illustrate the text, a portrait of an unidentified musician and another of Pvt. Louis D. Graveline.

Stragglers (p. 33)
Solo photos from our readers include Samuel Calhoun of the 7th Iowa Infantry, who wrote his name and regiment on the chinstrap of his cap, and a pair of images of Paul Zink of the 58th Ohio Infantry and his son Charles, who was killed in action in France in 1918.

Passing in Review (pp. 34-36)
Six publications are mentioned, including The Mutiny at Brandy Station: The Last Battle of the Hooker Brigade (Bates & Blood Press) by Frederick B. Arner, Årbok 1994 (Norsk Vapenhistorik Selskap) edited by Knut Erik Strom, The Shipwreck of Their Hopes (University of Illinois Press) by Peter Cozzens, Confederate Raider (Brassey’s) by John M. Taylor and more.

Captain Bob’s Caveat Emptorium (p.37)
In this column, the wily Captain attempts to convince readers that a portrait of a group of servants are Clara Barton posing with other Civil War nurses.

Sutlers’ Row (pp. 38-40)

Back cover
A salt print from the Thomas Woolworth Collection pictures Lt. William Coffin Little of the 1st City Guard, a San Francisco militia company.

Finding Aid: Summer 2017

The complete issue

Vol. XXXV, No. 3
(80 pages)

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Inside

Cover image
A sixth-plate ambrotype from the Rusty Hicks Collection pictures Benjamin James Hawthorne of the 38th Virginia Infantry.
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Table of Contents (p. 1)
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Editor’s Desk (p. 2)
In “Ushering in a New Era of Soldier Identification,” the editor introduces readers to CivilWarPhotoSleuth.com. A research tool designed for photo sleuths, it uses brings together photo archives, facial recognition and online community to identify unknown portraits of soldiers and sailors.
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Mail Call (pp. 3-4)
Feedback on the last issue includes a call to action for more photo collectors to help tell the stories of battles through the personal accounts of soldiers who participated, praise for the Spring 2017 issue and a correction for a misidentified image.
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Passing in Review (p. 6)
Bill Lipke and Bill Mares explore memory and monuments in Grafting Memory: Essays on War and Commemoration (Mares Publishing).
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Dream Reports: Excerpts from the Dream Journal of Alexander S. Paxton, 4th Virginia Infantry by Jonathan W. White (pp. 8-10)
Alexander Sterrett Paxton kept diaries of his dreams during the war. Six volumes in number, the diaries are a unique chronicle of how war invaded the dreams of a Confederate soldier.

Antebellum Warriors (p. 12)
A quarter-plate daguerreotype from the Dan Binder Collection pictures Daniel D. Tompkins, an early graduate of West Point who went on to serve a long and distinguished career that extended into the Civil War.

The Honored Few (p. 13)
In “Three Bullets at Gettysburg,” we meet James Monroe “Roe” Reisinger of the 150th Pennsylvania Infantry. He tells the story of how he suffered three bullet wounds on the first day of the Battle of Gettysburg. He received the Medal of Honor in 1907.

Most Hallowed Ground (p. 14)
Born in Georgia, raised in Alabama and educated in Tennessee, Fred Beall found himself in Mississippi when the war began. He joined the state’s 10th Cavalry. He is buried in the Confederate section of Arlington National Cemetery.

Uniforms & History by Michael J. McAfee (p. 16)
In “The Well-Dressed Militiaman: More than a ‘Shirt-collar and a pair of Spurs,’” Mike shares background information about militia uniforms. The column is illustrated with a circa 1860 ambrotype of Peter H. Hoyt of the “Independent Guard” of the 2nd Regiment Foot Militia of the State of New Jersey.

Photo Sleuth by Kurt Luther (pp. 18-19)
Kurt provides details about Civil War Photo Sleuth, a new digital tool that promises to redefine photo sleuthing. If you have an interest in trying out our software (for free) and providing feedback, Kurt notes, please visit CivilWarPhotoSleuth.com and sign up.
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Sons of Virginia (pp. 21-37)
A survey of 27 portraits and personal narratives are representative of the 155,000 Virginia volunteers who served in the Confederate military. Included is William Henry Magann of the 2nd Virginia Cavalry, who fought at the Battle of Brandy Station, John Thomas Willingham, who served as a courier and scout for Gen. Robert E. Lee, Benjamin James Hawthorne of the 38th Virginia Infantry, who survived the war and is pictured in the iconic photo of grizzled veterans reenacting Pickett’s Charge at the 50th anniversary encampment in 1913, and more.

Little Man, Lion Heart: The life and times of “Tete” Smith of the 4th Georgia Infantry by Robert W. Elliott with Ronald S. Coddington (pp. 38-40)
Lawyer, judge, and soldier, Capt. William Ephraim Smith received his nickname when he was a boy from a Frenchman. During the Civil War, he served with distinction until the Battle of King’s Schoolhouse, the first of the Seven Days Battles in 1862, ended his military career.

Faces of Gettysburg (pp. 41-53)
A survey of 25 portraits of identified soldiers, 22 Union and 3 Confederate, with short stories of how they came to be casualties during the 1863 Battle of Gettysburg. Included is George C. Gordon of the 24th Michigan Infantry, who was captured on July 1, James E. Glezen of the 137th New York Infantry, who was captured at Culp’s Hill on July 2 and Charles H. Womack of the 14th Virginia Infantry, who suffered a mortal wound during Pickett’s Charge on July 3.

For Life and Lone Star Honor: A Texan at Gettysburg by Miranda Dean (pp. 54-56)
Benjamin Asbury Campbell and his battle-hardened comrades in the 1st Texas Infantry attacked Union positions along Houck’s Ridge and the Devil’s Den on the afternoon of July 2. Many of them would not come put alive, including Campbell. His death deprived the regiment of a respected officer and his wife a husband.

Always a Collector: Images from the Mike Werner Collection (pp. 57-66)
If you have walked the aisles of any of the major Civil War shows over the years, chances are you’ve passed Mike Werner and his wife, Yvonne. Werner, a fourth generation farmer from Iowa, raises corn and soybeans. He is also a dedicated student of history. He’s been collecting since 1988, and representative images from his holdings are published here.

Stragglers: Distinctive Images from MI contributors (pp. 67-69)
Six images are included, and all are enlisted men in Gray. Two of the men are identified, Donalson Gwyn of the 1st Regiment, North Carolina Reserves and William S. Pessnell of the 22nd Alabama Infantry. Both men died of disease before the end of the war.

Dispatches from Hell: Junius Henri Browne’s great escape from Secessia by Ronald S. Coddington (pp. 70-73)
Browne, a war correspondent for Horace Greeley’s New York Tribune, fell into enemy hands near Vicksburg, Miss., on May 3, 1863. Treated as a combatant, he was hauled off to prison. This began a 20-month odyssey that ended with his dramatic escape from the prisoner of war camp at Salisbury, N.C. A portrait of Browne in the clothes he wore during his escape illustrates the narrative.

A Deaf Prince in Art and War: The Prince de Joinville, French exile and military advisor by Harry G. Lang (pp. 74-77)
Described by President Abraham Lincoln’s secretary John Hay as having the finest mind he ever met in the army, France’s Prince de Joinville was a highly capable military man. He was also deaf, which seemed not to deter from his effectiveness. Author Harry G. Lang, author of the new book Fighting in the Shadows: Untold Stories of Deaf People in the Civil War, takes a fresh look at the French royal.

Sutler’s Row (p. 79)

The Last Shot (p. 80)
Two Virginia heavy artillerymen attack a bottle of wine, as evidenced by the two generously filled drinking glasses. Theories for exactly what they celebrated abound: The Confederacy, joining the army, military success or comradeship to name a few.