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Military Images

Finding Aid: January/February 1990

The complete issue

Vol. XI, No. 4
(32 pages)

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Inside

Cover image
carte de visite from the New York State Division of Military & Naval Affairs pictures James W. Singleton, who appears to have suffered amputation of the right foot.

Editor’s Desk (p. 1)
The editor wishes subscribers a Happy New Year—and a new decade.

Mail Call (p. 3)
Letters to the editor include a note from the Save Historic Antietam Foundation, Inc., on efforts to establish an Irish Brigade monument on the battlefield, praise for Greg Mast’s Tar Heels and a firsthand account of the hanging of Sam Davis.

Passing in Review (pp. 4-5)
A total of 11 publications are mentioned: Union Forces of the American Civil War (Arms and Armor Press) by Philip Katcher, Antietam: The Soldier’s Battle (White Mane Publishing) by John Priest, Paper Medicine Man: John Bourke and His American West (University of Oklahoma Press) by Joseph C. Porter, Rebels and Yankees: Fighting Men of the Civil War (Gallery Books) by William C. Davis with Russ Pritchard and more.

G.O. No. 286 by Wendell Lang (pp. 6-7)
A general order dated Nov. 22, 1864, allowed Union officers to dispense with shoulder straps and other conspicuous insignia of rank. This was part of an effort by the military to prevent enemy sharpshooters from killing officers. Three portraits illustrate the text.

John Coffer, Photographer: Profile of an antiquarian lensman by Philip Katcher (pp. 8-11)
The story of modern tintype maker John A. Coffer of Dundee, N.Y., discusses how he got started, the process of photography and other aspects of his work. The narrative is illustrated with a half-dozen contemporary images.

The First Navy Cross: Biography of a Hero by Charles Schwartz (pp. 12-13)
The story of Charles Joseph Libby and his courage after the vessel in which he was assigned, the Shaw, was accidently struck by the HMS Aquitania. Libby’s portrait and other images illustrate the narrative.

An Ironclad Forgery by Jerry Harlowe (pp. 14-15)
The author shares the backstory of a 100-year-old stereoview that purports to be the famed ironclad Monitor when in fact it is a doctored view of the monitor class warship Passaic.

Empire State Soldiers: Images from New York’s Bureau of Military Statistics by Michael Winey (pp. 16-24)
In late 1862, the Bureau of Military Statistics of the State of New York was established to preserve soldier names, regimental records and community aid efforts to the military. What followed was an impressive effort to catalog, among other items, more than 2,000 soldier photographs. A sampling of these images, 24 in total, is included in this survey. They include the first chief of the Bureau, Col. Lockwood Lyon Doty, a trio of privates from the 93rd New York Infantry who appear to be former prisoners of war, and portraits of Capt. William Glenny, 64th New York Infantry, before and after his wounding at the Battle of Fair Oaks, Va.

Uniforms & History by Michael J. McAfee (p. 25)
In “143rd Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry, 1862,” McAfee explores the dress and regimental record of this organization. The text is illustrated with a portrait of Sgt. Austin Race of Company E.

Zouaves in the Streets of Baltimore by Ross Kelbaugh (pp. 26-27)
A photograph of soldiers purported to be the 5th New York in the streets of Baltimore during the winter of 1861-1862 is in fact the 6th Maryland National Guard in 1868. The author explains how he solved the photographic mystery.

Stragglers (pp. 28-32)
A total of 11 images submitted by readers includes an eight-plate tintype of a locomotive, a group of Union soldiers massed beneath a great arch to which is attached a shield with the name McClellan written upon it, and identified Marine, circa 1900-1914, and more.

Sutlers’ Row (Inside back cover)

Back cover
Quarter-plate ambrotype circa 1854 of an unidentified soldier photographed by Isaac Rehn of Philadelphia, Pa.

Finding Aid: November/December 1989

The complete issue

Vol. XI, No. 3
(32 pages)

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Cover image
An ambrotype from the Ambrose Lee collection pictures Pvt. William Henry Lee of the 24th North Carolina Infantry and his wife, Betsy Massingell Lee.

Editor’s Desk (p. 1)
The editor thanks Greg Mast for all his work on this North Carolina issue, mentions a nine-part series about the Civil War to air on public television, and issues a call for help to stop development of hallowed ground connected to the Cedar Creek battlefield.

Mail Call (p. 3)
Letters to the editor include a research request, a comment about the Maryland Guard jackets, and an observation about the chevrons worn by one of the soldiers in the gallery of comrades in the last issue.

Passing in Review (pp. 4-5)
Six publications are mentioned: The Birth of Colorado: A Civil War Perspective (University of Oklahoma Press) by Duane A. Smith, Shamrock and Sword: The Saint Patrick’s Battalion in the U.S.-Mexican War (University of Oklahoma Press) by Robert Ryal Miller, The Gettysburg Cyclorama (Thomas Publications) by Dean S. Thomas, War Diary of Bvt. Brig. Gen. Joseph Stockton, 72nd Illinois Infantry Vols. (Conflict Publishing) and more.

Tar Heels! by Greg Mast (pp. 6-31)
A collection of 84 images of North Carolina soldiers is featured in this expanded survey. It is subdivided into the following sections: Introduction, First at Bethel, Colonels, Musicians, Cavalry, Families at War, Farthest to the Front at Gettysburg, Artillerymen, That Incomparable Infantry, Divided Loyalties, Tar Heels in the West and Last at Appomattox.

Uniforms & History by Michael J. McAfee (p. 32)
In “North Carolina Troops, 1861,” McAfee explains that contrary to the popular image of the ragged rebel soldier of the Confederate army, these volunteers was in fact often well-equipped and uniformed—at least early in the war. The narrative is illustrated with an unidentified ambrotype from the Herb Peck collection.

Sutlers’ Row (Inside back cover)

Back cover
Three images of North Carolina soldiers are displayed, including Capt. John Hambrick of the 13th Infantry, Pvt. Joseph Hammul Woods of the 27th Infantry and Pvt. James Nathan Morgan of the 5th Infantry.

Finding Aid: September/October 1989

The complete issue

Vol. XI, No. 2
(32 pages)

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Cover image
A sixth-plate tintype from the Herb Peck Jr. collection is an unidentified young Texas infantryman.

Editor’s Desk (p. 1)
The editor observes that the response to the 10th anniversary was overwhelming and looks forward to serving subscribers in the coming decade and discusses the bid by the Irish Brigade Monument Committee to erect a monument on the battlefield of Antietam.

Mail Call (p. 3)
Letters to the editor include congratulations on the 10th anniversary of the magazine, praise for the all-Maryland issue, and the stealing of a Medal of Honor from the Rose Center in Morristown, Tenn.

Passing in Review (pp. 4-5)
Six publications are mentioned: Archaeological Perspectives on the Battle of the Little Big Horn (University of Oklahoma Press) by Douglas D. Scott, Civil War Justice: Union Army Executions Under Lincoln (White Mane Publishing) by Robert I. Alotta, Pictorial Encyclopedia of Civil War Medical Instruments and Equipment, Vol. II (Pictorial Histories Publishing Co.) by Dr. Gordon Dammann, Arming the Fleet: U.S. Navy Ordnance in the Muzzle-Loading Era (Naval Institute Press) by Spencer Tucker and more.

Pards Part 2: Comrades, pals and partners, from the collection of Richard Carlile (pp. 6-11)
A collection of 24 images of groups of soldiers that capture the bonds of loyalty and friendship forged by comrades during wartime.

The Hanging of Sam Davis by Mike Miner (pp. 12-14)
“Sam Davis was a Tennessee Confederate whose hanging created a legend that endures to this day,” notes the author, who observes that his moniker as the “Boy Hero of the Confederacy” was created by Confederate Veteran magazine. What follows is the story of Davis’ life and death.

A “Typo” Goes to War: William Walters, 4th Illinois Volunteers by John Graf (p. 15)
One of the typographers, or “typos,” that volunteered to join the army when war erupted between the U.S. and Mexico was William Waters of the 4th Illinois Infantry. His service was brief as he died of disease before he ever stepped foot in enemy country.

A Naval Portrait: Officers of the U.S.S. Amphitrite, 1900 by John Stacey (pp. 16-17)
A photograph of the officers of the double-turreted monitor commissioned in 1895 is accompanied by a brief history of the ship. Though the men are not identified, one of them wears a Medal of Honor.

“A Dreadful Slotter:” The 12th New Jersey at Spotsylvania by Edward Longacre (pp. 18-22)
An excerpt from the author’s new book about the regiment incudes 15 portraits: 1st Sgt. Henry Smith, Pvt. John Mullica, Lt. John Rich, Corp. John Tonkin, Lt. Col. Thomas Davis, Pvt. Charles Weideman, Lt. Charles Brown, Capt. Frank Acton, Lt. Ellis Phipps, Capt. Newton Brooks, Pvt. Charles Stratton, 1st Sgt. Azariah Stratton, Corp. Garrett Deacon, Lt. Charles Lippincott and Pvt. Albert Carll.

“Them Infernal Indians:” Letters from an Iowa cavalryman at Pea Ridge edited by Leigh Adams (pp. 23-24)
Excerpts of letters by Capt. Oliver Hazard Perry Scott of the 3rd Iowa Cavalry, who went on to become the major of his regiment before accepting the colonelcy of the 48th Iowa Infantry.

Foreigners All? By Irena Zagoff (pp. 25-27)
A collection of eight images of men dressed in uniforms that appear distinctly non-American might fool you.

Uniforms & History by Michael J. McAfee (pp. 28-29)
In “79th Regiment, New York State Militia,” McAfee explores the history of this Highland-inspired regiment. The narrative is illustrated by a portrait of an unidentified member of the regiment and a photograph of the regiment marching through Manhattan on July 4, 1860.

Dark Room (pp. 30-31)
Christopher Chamberlin of Kezar Falls, Maine, asked a question answered by this column: “I notice that a number of photographs in MI are printed in reverse, so that ‘US’ buckles, for instance, read ‘SU’ and so forth. Is this a printer’s error?”

Sutlers’ Row (p. 32)

Back cover
Three images are displayed, including a sergeant in the 146th New York Infantry, a private in the U.S. Dragoons and a private in the 51st Tennessee Infantry.

Finding Aid: May/June 1997

The complete issue

Vol. XVIII, No. 6
(40 pages)

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Inside

Cover image
From the Robert Lyon Collection, an outdoor portrait titled “A Slow Day at the Sutler’s,” is Plate No. 108 in Alexander Gardner’s classic book, Photographic Sketchbook of the War.

Table of Contents (p. 1)

Editor’s Desk (p. 3)
The editor introduces readers to Jerry Russell, “The strongest voice in the Battlefield Preservation movement. Jerry is head of Civil War Round Table Associates, a non-profit umbrella that carries news to and from the hundreds of CW Round Tables in the country.”

Mail Call (pp. 4-5)
Letters include feedback about the recent Philadelphia National Guards feature, kudos to Chris Nelson for his fascinating story about Brig. Gen. Augustus “Augie” Corliss, and praise for The Auction Block and Captain Bob’s Caveat Emptorium.

Heavy Headgear: Soldierly Chapeaux from the Official to the Outlandish (pp. 6-18)
The staggering variation in headgear from the antebellum years through World War I is examined in seven groupings: Officers, Variations on the Kepi, Comfort in Camp, Shakos & Sombreros, The Helmet Blossoms, Odds & Sods of The Haberdashers from Hell and End of an Era. A total of 50 portraits are included.

Civil War Patriotic Covers by Bruce Mowday (pp. 19-21)
Billed as “another sort of military images,” the author tells the story of how patriotic covers he purchased at a 1995 Civil War Show started him on a path to learn more about the origins and history these illustrated envelopes. The narrative is illustrated with 14 examples.

William T. Sampson: Naval Biography by Jerry Harlowe (p. 22)
New York born and Naval Academy educated William Thomas Sampson served his first post-graduation combat assignment off Charleston, S.C., on the ironclad Patapsco in 1864. The story of his pre-combat assignments and his post-war military life is told here, illustrated by two portraits.

Midshipman Thompson’s Trumpet by Davis M. Sullivan (p. 23)
Robert Means Thompson’s zealous efforts to master bugle calls prompted Vice Adm. David Dixon Porter to issue a stern warning to the midshipman. Porter’s order, and the rest of Thompson’s life and military career, is detailed here. The narrative is illustrated with the subject’s portrait.

The Royal Navy at Charleston, S.C., 1863 by David Norris (pp. 24-27)
This investigation into a photograph of the Confederate ironclad Chicora revealed little known and controversial activities of the British Navy during the Civil War. The Chicora photograph and a wartime engraving of the Union fleet illustrate the text.

The Will That Started a War: Major Emil Fritz, Billy the Kid and the Lincoln County War by Charles Anegan (pp. 28)
Emil Fritz had a relatively uneventful military career as a captain in the 1st California Cavalry during the Civil War. His 1873 will was a different story. According to the author, it set the spark to the tinder that was the bloody Lincoln County War.

The Auction Block (p. 29)

Capt. Bob’s Caveat Emptorium (p. 30)
In this installment, the sly captain tries to sell readers a U.S. sharpshooter portrait. But let the buyer beware! Looks can be deceiving, as is certainly the case here.

Stragglers (pp. 31-34)
Seven images are featured, including a postwar camp scene, a group of soldiers with tin cups and other camp wares, a World War I era image of two women boxing and more.

Light & Shadow (p. 35)
In this installment of technical aspects of photography and collecting, David Norris shares an article from the March 26, 1864, issue of the Raleigh, N.C. Confederate. The gist of the story is that a photographer was called in to make an image of a murdered man’s eyes to see if the reflection of the face of the killer could be seen. According to the report, it was.

Uniforms & History by Michael J. McAfee (pp. 36-37)
In “‘The Polish Legion,’ Company, C, 31st New York Volunteer Infantry,” McAfee examines the distinctive uniform and record of this Empire State regiment. The column is illustrated with a drawing by the author, a portrait of a “Col. Rasinski,” and a stereoview of volunteers at Park Barracks, N.Y., where the regiment was organzed.

Passing in Review (p. 38)
Four publications are mentioned, including The Civil War in Books, an Analytical Bibliography (University of Illinois Press) by David Eicher, Encyclopedia of United States Army Insignia and Uniforms (University of Oklahoma Press) by William K. Emerson, A Generation on the March: The Union Army at Gettysburg (Thomas Publications) by Edmund J. Raus and Capital Navy: Confederate Naval Operations on the James River (Savas Woodbury) by John M. Coski.

Sutlers’ Row (pp. 39-40)

Back cover
A civilian-to-soldier double exposure carte de visite from the Robert Lyon Collection.

Finding Aid: March/April 1997

The complete issue

Vol. XVIII, No. 5
(40 pages)

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Inside

Cover image
A sampling of six images of Civil War soldiers from the James Stamatelos Collection.

Table of Contents (p. 1)

Editor’s Desk (p. 3)
The editor highlights the online destinations Gettysburg Discussion Group and The Daguerreian Society, two of hundreds of webs site related to the Civil War, and announces that work is underway for a commercial web site for Military Images.

Mail Call (pp. 4-5)
Letters include requests to identify a uniform and a family photograph, and a call for classified advertisers to observe common courtesy and respond when contacted.

Passing in Review (p. 6)
Two publications are mentioned: A Duryee Zouave (Patrick Schroeder Publications) by Thomas P. Southwick and Uncertain Glory: Lee’s Generalship Re-Examined (Hippocrene Books) by John D. McKenzie.

James Stamatelos conducted by Helder Costa (pp. 7-35)
A total of 107 representative images from the collection of Mr. Stamatelos, proprietor of Sutler’s Wagon of Cambridge, Mass. Who has dealt in Civil War artifacts and photographs for 22 years. This extensive examination of his collection begins with an interview by Helder Costa and is followed by the images, which are organized in six sections: Arms & Equipment, Sailors and Marines, Infantry, Musicians and Other Specialists, Painted Backdrops and Cavalry.

Uniforms & History by Michael J. McAfee (pp. 37-38)
In “The New England Guard, Company A, 4th Battalion of Infantry, Massachusetts Volunteer Militia,” McAfee examines the distinctive uniform and record of this Bay State regiment. The column is illustrated with portraits of Maj. Thomas G. Stevenson and an unidentified soldier.

Sutlers’ Row (pp. 39-40)

Back cover
A sampling of six images of Civil War soldiers from the James Stamatelos Collection.

Finding Aid: May/June 1996

The complete issue

Vol. XVII, No. 6
(40 pages)

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Inside

Cover image
Col. William H. Link of the 12th Indiana Infantry suffered mortal wounds at the Battle of Richmond, Ky., on Aug. 30, 1862. The large format albumen portrait is part of the collection of the Allen County-Fort Wayne Historical Society.

Table of Contents (p. 1)

Editor’s Desk (p. 3)
The editor discusses two important preservation organizations, the Gettysburg Battlefield Preservation Association (GBPA) and the Friends of the National Parks at Gettysburg.

Mail Call (pp. 4-5)
Letters include numerous congratulations on the publication of the 100th issue and comments about the magazine’s focus on Civil War images.

Passing in Review (pp. 6-7)
Eight publications are mentioned, including An Immigrant Soldier in the Mexican War (Texas A&M University Press) by Frederick Zeh, Mothers of Invention (University of North Carolina Press) by Drew Gilpin Faust, Jackson & Lee: Legends in Gray (Rutledge Hill Press) by James I. Roberston Jr. with paintings by Mort Kunstler, Sumter is Avenged! The Siege and Reduction of Fort Pulaski (White Mane Publishing) by Herbert Schiller, and more.

Hoosier Horsemen: Indiana’s Cavalry and Mounted Infantry in the Civil War by John Sickles (pp. 8-11)
An overview of Indiana’s contributions to the Union war effort is illustrated with nine identified portraits: 1st Lt. Wiley Baker of the 8th Cavalry, Col. George Jackson and Lt. Col. Eli Lilly of the 9th Cavalry, Col. Robert R. Stewart and Pvt. Isaac Clem of the 11th Cavalry, Col. Thomas Lucas of the 16th Mounted Infantry, Sgt. Charles Hughes of the 17th Mounted Infantry, Pvt. George Fisher o the 65th Infantry, Maj. Lawson Kilbourn of the 72nd Mounted Infantry and Col. John T. Wilder, commander of “Wilder’s Lightning Brigade.”

“Good News from Our Army at Vicksburg…I am Well” by Steve Rudloff (pp. 12-15)
The Civil War service of Joseph C. Hawkins of the 100th Indiana Infantry features three wartime and post-war portraits of the subject, a portrait of his son, Pvt. John Samuel Hawkins of the 13th Missouri Infantry, and a hand-drawn map of the Tunnel Hill, Ga., battlefield.

Some Indiana Faces (pp. 16-19)
Representative portraits of some of the 200,000 men from the Hoosier State include 12 men who served in 137 regiments and 26 batteries. Among those pictured is Maj. Nimrod Headington of the 34th Infantry, Dum Major William Merchon of the 30th Infantry, Principal Musician John R. Grubb of the 44th Infantry, Lt. James Weaver of the 12th Infantry and Pvt. James Fisher of the 52nd Infantry.

Disaster at Sea! Steamer General Lyon Burns, Sinks by Robert Gormley (pp. 20-21)
An account of an explosion that destroyed the transport General Lyon off Cape Hatteras, N.C., on March 31, 1865, and claimed the lives of 200 men from the 56th Illinois Infantry. The narrative is illustrated with portraits of Capt. John Barker, who was not aboard the vessel, Lt. John Lewis, who was lost at sea as a result of the accident, and an outdoor view of Company C of the regiment.

H.B. King and P.R. Read: Taunton Civil War Portrait Photographers by Paul R. Johnson, M.D. (pp. 22-25)
The southeastern Massachusetts town sent a large number of its sons into the Union army. Two local photographers, Horatio B. King and Paddock R. Read, captured the likenesses of many of these citizen soldiers. A wartime newspaper advertisement and images of King’s studio illustrate the text, as well as five soldier portraits.

Tomorrow’s Heroes: An Album of Cadets & Kids in Uniform (pp. 26-29)
A survey of 16 portraits of boys and young men from the Civil War through World War I include a trio of lads dressed in Zouave uniforms, a drummer inscribed “Taken just before I went to war,” and a “major” and “captain” in World War I uniforms complete with a 2nd Division patch.

The Civil War Through Civilian Photographs by Juanita Leisch (pp. 30-32)
A photo essay that attempts to trace the progress of the Civil War through civilian photographs includes 13 portraits. They include a carte de visite of seven teen-aged boys that appears to show the choice between continuing in school or joining the army, and a selection of boys and girls with drums and flags.

Light & Shadow (p. 33)
In this installment of technical aspects of photography and collecting, Contributing Editor Mark Dunkelman offers an article about Fort Sumter photographs that appeared in the Oct. 20, 1863, issue of the Providence Daily Journal.

Stragglers (p. 34)
Solo photographs of humorous and unusual subjects submitted by our readers include a woman in patriotic costume, an antebellum militiaman dressed in a Hussar uniform and a group of smiling doughboys.

Uniforms & History by Michael J. McAfee (pp. 35-36)
In “11th Regiment—Indiana Zouaves, 1861,” McAfee examines the distinctive uniform and record of this Hoosier regiment. The column is illustrated with a portrait of Pvt. Edward Castalor of Company H.

The Auction Block (p. 37)

Sutlers’ Row (pp. 38-40)

Back cover
A carte de visite from the Donald Wisnoski Collection is a portrait of a New York Zouave.

Finding Aid: November/December 1994

The complete issue

Vol. XVI, No. 3
(40 pages)

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Inside

Cover image
carte de visite from the Mike McAfee Collection is an outdoor portrait of Pvt. Richard L. Cramer of the 4th Michigan Infantry from the Mathew B. Brady series “Illustrations of Camp Life.”

Editor’s Desk (p. 1)
The editor introduces the theme of this issue, Wolverine soldiers, and credits Dale Niesen as the driving force behind its success. He also mentions a need to boost subscription numbers and asks readers to consider gift subscriptions to friends and local libraries.

Mail Call (p. 3)
Letters include an article from the June 4, 1864, issue of the Cohoes Cataract about a broken ambrotype, belated praise for the 1989 Tar Heel issue and encouragement to keep the Southern images coming.

Passing in Review (p. 5)
Two publications are mentioned: A Surgeon’s Civil War: The Letters & Diary of Daniel M. Holt, M.D. (Kent State University Press) edited by James Greiner, Janet Coryell and James Smither and Defend the Valley (Orion Books) by Margaretta Barton Colt.

Wolverines: A Photographic Study of Men from the Great Lakes State in the War of the Rebellion compiled by Dale R. Niesen with Robert Coch and William Munday (pp. 6-35)
A total of 117 images is a celebration of Michiganders who fought for the Union. The survey is divided into 10 sections: Overview, Infantry, Colored Infantry, 1st Michigan Engineers & Mechanics, Sharpshooters, Chaplains, Medical Service, Field Artillery, Field Musicians and Cavalry. Portraits include Col. Norman J. Hall of the 7th Infantry, Philippine Island-born Pvt. Felix Balderry of the 11th Infantry, Sgt. Warren Sharp of the 1st Sharpshooters, Hospital Steward Henry Henshaw of the 2nd Cavalry, 2nd Lt. Edmond Luce of Battery H, Musician William Welsh of the 16th Infantry, Pvt. Eugene King Starkweather of the 5th Cavalry, Pvt. Augustus Shiegley of the 9th Cavalry and many more.

Uniforms & History by Michael J. McAfee (p. 37)
In “Fourth Michigan Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1864,” McAfee examines the cover image and provides an account of the regiment during its years in service.

Sutlers’ Row (pp. 38-40)

Back cover
A tintype from the State Museum of Michigan Collection pictures Medal of Honor recipient Smith Hastings of the 5th Michigan Cavalry astride his horse.

Finding Aid: September/October 1993

The complete issue

Vol. XV, No. 2
(32 pages)

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Inside

Cover image
A sixth-plate ambrotype from the Herb Peck Jr. Collection pictures a group of Union soldiers, the soldier in the foreground sits upon a drum.

Editor’s Desk (p. 1)
The editor informs readers that a site has been selected for the Gen. James Longstreet monument at Gettysburg, and that an all-navy issue is in development.

Mail Call (pp. 2-3)
Letters include a comment on a backdrop, the recovery of stolen weapons and compliments from a subscriber in France.

Passing in Review (p. 5)
Five publications are mentioned, including Lonestar Preacher (Texas Christian University Press) by John W. Thomason, John T. McMahon’s Diary of the 136th New York, 1861-1864 (White Mane Publishing) edited by John Michael Priest, My Brother’s Face: Portraits of the Civil War (Chronicle Books) by Charles Phillips and Alan Axelrod, This War So Horrible: The Civil War of Hiram Smith Williams (University of Alabama Press) edited by Lewis Wynn and Robert Taylor and The Last Full Measure: The Life and Death of the First Minnesota Volunteers (Henry Holt & Co.) by Richard Moe.

Casualties: Sixteen Portraits of the Grim Face of War excerpted from the new book by Richard Matthews (pp. 6-11)
Excerpts from frequent MI contributor Dick Matthews’ new book, One Day of Glory: A History of the 149th Pennsylvania Infantry include portraits of Miles Beaty, Henry Spayd, John D. Snyder, Michael Smyser, Henry Lentz, Frederick Matthews and ten more.

California Gold: Images from the collection of Robert Kotchian (pp. 12-15)
Eleven gems from this West Coast collector include Fort Point on San Francisco Bay, a patriotic Vermont woman, Fort Assinniboine, Mont., a Buffalo soldier, Capt. Willis Wittich of the 21st U.S. Infantry on a bicycle and more.

“Anonymous:” Photographer to the Sixth Corps by Joseph Covais (pp. 16-21)
A survey of 15 portraits, all linked by the same painted canvas backdrop and connected to the Sixth Corps of the Union army.

The Photograph Album of Captain Joseph P. Reel: Company G, 93rd Illinois Infantry by Scott Cross (pp. 22-24)
A dozen portraits are presented here, along with a brief history of the regiment. All of the images are identified, and they include Pvt. Daniel Ilgen, Lt. Samuel Daughenbaugh, Capt. Charles F. Taggart, Chaplain Charles Hagerty, 1st Lt. Charles Hartsough, Lt. Harvey Trimble and more.

“If Only…” or Through a Glass Lightly: An exploration of photographic possibilities with certain ambrotypes by David Wynn Vaughan (pp. 25-26)
The author explains how he arranged to have a modern print made of a faded ambrotype. The modern print revealed details that were not easily visible on the original.

Battle Born! Charles McDermit and the Nevada Territory Volunteers in the Civil War by Jeff Klages (pp. 27-29)
This look at Nevada’s contribution to Union arms includes a list of military organizations raised in the territory and four portraits, including McDermit and his son, Charles.

Sutlers’ Row (pp. 30-32)

Back cover
A sixth-plate ambrotype from the Herb Peck Jr. Collection pictures a young man in civilian dress with a Confederate national flag.

Finding Aid: September/October 1996

The complete issue

Vol. XVIII, No. 2
(40 pages)

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Inside

Cover image
A large photographic print taken in Buffalo circa 188-1891 pictures a group of soldiers standing in front of train. One soldier’s knapsack is labeled “10th Separate Company.” The image is part of the Tom Moeller Collection.

Table of Contents (p. 1)

Editor’s Desk (p. 3)
The fight to save Buffington Island, Ohio, and the launch of the African American Civil War Memorial Campaign are among the items mentioned in this issue.

Mail Call (pp. 4-5)
Letters include information about the burial of South Carolina soldiers, Mann accouterments, the Kearsarge at Cherbourg and more.

Passing in Review (p. 6)
Three publications are mentioned, including Fields of Battle: The Wars for North America (Alfred A. Knopf) by John Keegan, Forging a Nation from Revolution to Civil War (Eagle Press) by Linda Zimmerman with Richard Ricca and They Rode with Forrest and Wheeler: A Chronicle of Five Tennessee Brothers in the Confederate Western Cavalry (McFarland & Co.) by John E. Fisher.

The Auction Block (p. 7)

“For God’s Sake, Hurry Up…” The Fifth Michigan Infantry at Williamsburg May 5, 1862 by John Braden (pp. 8-12)
A narrative of events related to these Michiganders is illustrated with eight portraits of its members. They include Col. Henry Terry, Lt. Col. Samuel Beach, Elbridge and Luther Franklin, Capt. Heber LeFavour, Pvt. John Boshaw, Sgt. John Fortier, Capt. Edwin Sherlock and 1st Lt. John Braden.

Three Hospitals: Photographic views of a trio of Civil War medical facilities by John Halliday (pp. 13-17)
New Haven Hospital, Lovell General Hospital and Chesapeake Hospital are featured, each represented by numerous outdoor views and portraits of those connected to the facilities.

Arm Bands of World War I by Roger Norland (pp. 18-19)
A survey of seven images of doughboy wearing arm bands that indicate their service as medical corpsmen, military police, headquarters staff and more.

Proppin’ the Prop: A glimpse at martial and patriotic props used by Civil War photographers by Roy Mantle (pp. 20-29)
A survey of 13 portraits shows how citizen soldiers posed with equipment, flags and backdrops to underscore their patriotism.

Stragglers (pp. 30-33)
“Solo photos of the odd & unusual from the collections of our readers” includes two poignant portraits of a mother and father posing with the body of their soldier son, a frontier character, a trio of Yankee tipplers, the crew of a Gatling gun from the Spanish-American War era, a World War I period image of a British American banquet in Capetown, South Africa, and more.

Captain Bob’s Caveat Emptorium (p. 35)
The author attempts to convince us that two modern wet-plate images are 19th century originals.

Light & Shadow: Technical Aspects of Photography & Collecting (pp. 36-37)
A moving poem by Douglas Spencer about his experience of finding a portrait of his great-great uncle, Lewis Longworthy of the 33rd Illinois Infantry, at the U.S. Army Military History Institute at Carlisle Barracks, Pa.

Sutlers’ Row (pp. 38-39)

Finding Aid: July/August 1996

The complete issue

Vol. XVIII, No. 1
(40 pages)

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Inside

Cover image
A tintype courtesy of S.W. Bondurant M.D. pictures Corp. Samuel Francis Bondurant of the 4th Alabama Infantry. He was wounded on July 2, 1863, in the fighting on Little Round Top during the Battle of Gettysburg.

Table of Contents (p. 1)

Editor’s Desk (p. 3)
The editor introduces the Gettysburg theme for this issue, and reflects on the pain and suffering of the 51,000 casualties left after the three-day engagement.

Mail Call (pp. 5-6)
Letters include a request for an article about the Grand Army of the Republic and best wishes to MI for its 100th issue—and looking forward to issue 200!

Passing in Review (p. 6)
Six publications are mentioned, including Soldier Boy: The Civil War Letters of Charles O. Musser, 29th Iowa (University of Iowa Press) edited by Barry Popchock, The Ties of the Past: The Gettysburg Diaries of Salome Myers Stewart, 1854-1922 (Thomas Publications) by Sarah Sites Rodgers, Lee the Soldier (University of Nebraska Press) edited by Gary W. Gallagher, Arrogant Armies: Great Military Disasters and the Generals Behind Them (Wiley) by James M. Perry and more.

Gettysburg Faces: A Portrait Album (pp. 7-32)
A total of 94 portraits of soldiers who became casualties at Gettysburg are accompanied by captions that provide basic details of their plight during the battle. They include Brig. Gen. Gabriel Rene Paul, Sgt. John B. Yarbrough of the 13th North Carolina Infantry, Pvt. Joseph T. Yarbrough of the 45th North Carolina Infantry, Cpl. James Brownlee of the 134th New York Infantry, Pvt. Victor Hallock of the 147th New York Infantry, Lt. William M. Nunnally of the 13th North Carolina Infantry, Lt. West Funk of the 121st Pennsylvania Infantry, Pvt. Benjamin F. Chase of the 2nd New Hampshire Infantry, Lt. George Myers of the 8th South Carolina Infantry, Lt. Frederick Boalt of the 55th Ohio Infantry and more.

Stragglers (p. 33)
Unusual images from the collections of our readers are represented by a single albumen image of vessels from the collection of Dale Snair. One of the ships bears resemblance to the Kearsarge, and this may be a view of Cherbourg, France, where the vessel was victorious over the rebel raider Alabama and its Capt. Raphael Semmes.

The Auction Block (p. 34)

Uniforms & History by Michael J. McAfee (p. 35)
In “The 146th New York Infantry, ‘Garrard’s Tigers,’” McAfee explores the uniforms and history of this organization. The narrative is illustrated with portraits of a corporal and a musician from the regiment.

Captain Bob’s Caveat Emptorium (pp. 36-37)
The author attempts to stump readers with fantastic claims about soldier and sailor portraits in this installment of the occasional series.

Sutlers’ Row (pp. 38-40)

Back cover
A carte de visite from the Rick Carlile collection pictures Pvt. Benjamin F. Falls of the 19th Massachusetts Infantry, who received the Medal of Honor for wresting a Confederate flag from its bearer during the Battle of Gettysburg on July 3, 1863.