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Military Images

Finding Aid: September/October 1992

The complete issue

Vol. XIII, No. 5
(32 pages)

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Cover image
A sixth-plate melainotype from the David W. Vaughan collection pictures an unknown soldier, possibly a Georgian, holding a Bowie knife and wearing an Italian-influenced Corsican cap.

Editor’s Desk (p. 1)
The editor informs readers that one report has surfaced of an image of a re-enactor being offered for sale by an antique dealer who did not know or care that the image was a reproduction. Also of note is that the 104th Pennsylvania Infantry, a history of which appeared in the March/April issue, will have its monument rededicated next year.

Mail Call (p. 3)
The letters to the editor includes the identification of a Michigan soldier, a note about the earliest-known image of an American soldier, comments on reproduction images and more.

Passing in Review (p. 5)
Six publications are mentioned, including The First Day at Gettysburg: Essays on Confederate and Union Leadership (Kent State University Press) edited by Gary Gallagher, The Custer Reader (University of Nebraska Press) edited by Paul Andrew Hutton, Advance the Colors: Pennsylvania Civil War Battle Flags (Capitol Preservation Committee) by Richard A. Sauers, The Harper Encyclopedia of Military Biography (Harper Collins) by Trevor N. Dupuy, Curt Johnson and David L. Bongard, Gettysburg: A Battlefield Atlas (Nautical & Aviation Publishing Co. of America) by Craig L. Symonds and General John H. Winder, C.S.A. (University of Florida Press) by Arch Frederick Blakey.

Four Marines at Fort Fisher by David Sullivan (pp. 6-8)
Profiles include Capt. Lucien LeCompte Dawson, 1st Lt. Charles Fremont Williams, Cpl. Andrew Jackson Tomlin (Medal of Honor recipient) and Pvt. Henry B. Hallowell.

A Tale of Five Taylors and Five More Tar Heels by Greg Mast (pp. 10-15)
The life and military service of the Taylor boys include three brothers who served in the 1st Infantry, McGilbry, John and Joseph, brother William of the 8th Infantry and brother Henry D. of the 44th Infantry. Wartime portraits are included for all five soldiers. Also included is a circa 1860 portrait of their parents, Josiah and Cressea Taylor. The other Tar Heel soldiers are Egbert A. Ross of the 11th Infantry, Patrick H. Jenkins of the 1st Infantry, Wright Steven Batchelor of the 47th Infantry and Seaton G. and Richard J. Durham of the 12th Infantry.

The Fight for the City of Mexico: Letters of Captain William Chapman, 5th U.S. Infantry edited by William Dunniway (pp. 16-18)
Native Marylander Chapman, a graduate of West Point in 1831, fought in the Mexican War and the Civil War. He was a prolific letter writer, according to the author, who presents excerpts here. The narrative is illustrated by two portraits of Chapman, a Mexican War era daguerreotype of him with a friend, possibly Moses Merrill, and another of Chapman as lieutenant colonel of the Union’s 2nd Maryland Infantry.

Six Southerners: Vignettes of rebels at war by John Graf (pp. 19-23)
Profiles include brothers George and James McCabe of the 1st Company, Richmond Howitzers, John D. Simms of the Marine Corps and Isaac, James and John Reeves of the 10th Louisiana Infantry. Portraits of all of these men, with the exception of John Reeves, illustrate the text.

Caped Crusaders! A look at winter wear in the Union army by Cyrus Tenney (pp. 24-25)
A survey of five images picture soldiers clad in greatcoats.

A Triumph of the Wet Plate: A new look at Gardner’s Photographic Sketchbook by Marc Daniels (pp. 26-29)
The author examines four images from photographer Alexander Gardner’s book: Plate 21 (Dunker Church at Antietam), Plate 22 (Union signal detachment on Elk Mountain in Maryland), Plate 65 (Jericho Mills, North Anna River) and Plate 67 (Quarles Mill, North Anna River).

Stragglers (pp. 30-31)
Solo photos of the interesting and the unique, from the collections of our readers includes two images: A militia officer dressed in an ornate light-colored coat with prominent trim in the shape of sideways “V”s and a Union soldier holding a musket above his head.

Sutlers’ Row (p. 32)

Back cover
A ninth-plate ambrotype from the David W. Vaughan collection is a portrait of an unknown Southern volunteer, circa 1861.

Finding Aid: March/April 1992

The complete issue

Vol. XIII, No. 5
(32 pages)

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Cover image
A portrait of an unknown officer of the 7th U.S. Cavalry wearing the ultra rare M1902 “winged horseshoe” insignia of the regimental veterinarian.

Editor’s Desk (p. 1)
The editor issues a call to readers to help solve the problem of fake images on the collector’s market.

Mail Call (p. 3)
The letters to the editor include praise for the story about the previously unpublished image of Confederate prisoners of war, a question about the identity of a soldier on the back cover of the May/June 1991 issue and observations on modern photographers practicing 19th century methods.

Passing in Review (p. 5)
Two books are mentioned, including 1st South Carolina Volunteers (Gregg’s) (Design Folio) by Ron Field and Eyewitness at Wounded Knee (University of Nebraska Press) by Richard Jensen, Eli Paul and John Carter.

Private Spurgeon Goes to Cuba: A 7th Cavalry Photo Album by Robert Kotchian (pp. 6-7)
Selected images from the photo album of Clifford Spurgeon, who served in the 7th U.S. Cavalry from 1897-1900, includes a portrait of Spurgeon on is mount, a burial party in Cuba and more.

The Guns of Gettysburg and Other Photographic Oddities at the 1991 Mason-Dixon Show (pp. 8-13)
A selection of images scanned at the annual event is subdivided into the following groupings: Artillerymen, sharpshooters, street scenes, Confederates and near Confederates, Zouaves and near Zouaves, cavalrymen, sailors, and four from West Coast collector Peter Buxton.

A Most Impressive Sight: The burning of the U.S.S. Monongahela on St. Patrick’s Day, 1908 as told to Charles Jackson by Frank Jackson, USN (pp. 14-15)
A celebration to honor Saint Pat on March 17, 1908, spelled doom for the venerable Civil War-era vessel Monongahela when a rocket fuse was accidently lit and started a fire that ended in disaster. First Class Blacksmith Frank Jackson of the U.S. Navy told this story to his son Frank. The narrative is illustrated with a portraits of Frank and the Monongahela.

The Keystone Travelers: Regimental History of the 104th Pennsylvania Infantry by Joseph G. Bilby (pp. 16-23)
Raised as the “Ringgold Regiment” in Bucks County, Pa., the story of the 104th is told in words and pictures. The latter includes portraits of Division commander Gen. Silas Casey, Col. William W.H. Davis, Lt. E. Sayers McDowell, Pvt. William Harrison Hibbs, Pvt. Thomas Smith, Sgt. W.H. Edwards, Lt. Harry Kessler and Pvt. Richard Clayton.

Headquarters for Photographs: A delightful assortment of wondrous images from our readers (pp. 24-29)
A total of 15 images are featured, and the star of the show is quarter-plate ambrotype from the John McWilliams collection of a photographer’s tent, outside of which stands the staff and a soldier who peers at a case that may contain his likeness. The tent is labeled “Headquarters for Photographs.”

Uniforms & History by Michael J. McAfee (pp. 30-31)
In “The Seventh Regiment, New York State Militia,” McAfee examines the origins of this respected regiment and its chasseur-inspired uniform. Portraits of two unidentified privates illustrate the text.

Sutlers’ Row (p. 32)

Back cover
A portrait from the Peter Buxton collection is an antebellum Marine lieutenant. He bears a striking resemblance to Paymaster John C. Cash.

Finding Aid: November/December 1991

The complete issue

Vol. XIII, No. 3
(32 pages)

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Cover image
An ambrotype from the N.D. Lyons collection is a portrait of Pvt. Andrew Jackson Read of the 5th Texas Infantry.

Editor’s Desk (p. 1)
The editor announces that this issue is “chockablock full of outstanding images from south of the lie surveyed by Mssrs. Mason and Dixon,” mentions a search for any photograph of any Confederate enlisted man who participated in Pickett’s Charge, and gives thanks for all our blessings in the holiday season.

Mail Call (p. 3)
The letters to the editor includes a comment about Sgt. Gilbert Bates, praise for the all-Vermont issue, and a request for a wartime photo of J.F.J. Caldwell, author of The History of a Brigade of South Carolinians.

Passing in Review (p. 5)
A publication, Zouaves: The First and the Bravest (Thomas Publications) by Michael J. McAfee, is mentioned and three cassette tapes of Civil War era music are reviewed.

A Regiment of Rebels: Confederate images in the collection of David C. Williams (pp. 7-13)
According to the introduction of this quiz, “Grey uniforms do not a Rebel make. At least one (and perhaps more) of the soldiers on these two pages are not Confederates. Can you find the Yankee(s) in the woodpile?” What follows is seven numbered images, with answers at the bottom of the page.

Just from Dixie: A previously unpublished image of Confederate prisoners of war (pp. 16-21)
Renowned Confederate uniform authority Les Jensen evaluated an unusual group portrait of Confederate prisoners of war flanked by their Union captors. Another version of the same image has an inscription, “Taken in the streets of Chicago—Rebbs.” Other evidence indicates that the image relates to Camp Douglas, the Confederate prisoner of war camp in Chicago. Another 12 images of Confederates, seemingly unrelated to the feature photograph, are also included.

Southern Soldiers: Vignettes of Seven Southerners in the War Between the States (pp. 22-25)
Profiles include Ambrose Doss of the 19th Alabama Infantry, Eliazar Taylor of the 46th Georgia Infantry, Thomas G. Woodward of the Kentucky Irregular Cavalry, Camillo Casatti Cadmus Carr of the 1st United States Cavalry, Isaac J. Howlett of the 48th Tennessee Infantry and Paul Adolphe LeBleu and Joseph Camersac LeBleu of the 10th Louisiana Infantry and 7th Louisiana Cavalry. Each profile is illustrated with a portrait of the soldier.

Jeff. Davis and the South!: Commentary on an unknown Mississippi photographer by Lawrence T. Jones III (pp. 26-29)
Five images of soldiers all posed with a distinctive sign upon which is written “Jeff. Davis and the South!” is the subject of this exploration that addresses the possible location of the unknown photographer and the use of props.

Captain Bob’s Caveat Emptorium (p. 31)
The Captain is at it again! This time, he shares another modern portrait of a pair of re-enactors taken by photographer Claude Levet.

Sutlers’ Row (p. 32)

Back cover
Two portraits are featured, an unknown soldier from the 53rd Virginia Infantry and Col. Bryan Grimes of the 4th North Carolina Infantry with Edwin A. Osborne and Surg. J.F. Shaffner.

Finding Aid: May/June 1991

The complete issue

Vol. XII, No. 6
(32 pages)

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Cover image
A sixth-plate tintype from the Herb Peck Jr. collection pictures a Union trooper from the 2nd Cavalry (Iowa or Missouri) posed in front of the well-known Benton Barracks backdrop.

Editor’s Desk (p. 1)
The editor announces that a professional indexer has offered to produce an index of the first twelve years of MI, and previews content for upcoming issues.

Mail Call (pp. 2-3)
The letters to the editor about the last issue include a question about the map used in the McClellan photo examination, a revelation that the Benjamin Prather letter is a forgery, a misidentified officer in the 61st New York Infantry and an observation that the cover photo is a member of the 6th Pennsylvania Cavalry, or Rush’s Lancers, and not an artilleryman as indicated in the caption.

Passing in Review (p. 5)
Seven publications are mentioned, including Portraits of Conflict: A Photographic History of Louisiana in the Civil War (University of Arkansas Press) by Carl Moneyhon and Bobby Roberts, Confederate Goliath: The Battle of Fort Fisher (Harper Collins) by Rod Gragg, Sykes’ Regular Infantry Division, 1861-1864 (McFarland & Co.) by Timothy J. Reese, Financial Failure and Confederate Defeat (University of Illinois Press) by Douglas B. Ball and more.

The Tenth Cavalry at Fort Robinson, 1902-1907 by Tom Buecker (pp. 6-10)
The Indian Wars that dominated America had come to a close by the early part of the 10th century, and with it many of the frontier U.S. army posts were abandoned. Fort Robinson, in northwestern Nebraska, was an exception. This story provides context through the lens of the 10th U.S. Cavalry and its occupation of the fort. The text is illustrated with eight images of the regiment during this period.

Claimant No. 722998 and Other Tales of Civil War Soldiers (pp. 11-15)
Six profiles of Union and Confederate soldiers include William F. Hoch of the 4th Kentucky Mounted Infantry, Otis Whitney Jr. of the 27th Iowa Infantry, Andrew G. Walton of the 23rd Virginia Infantry, French Stother McCabe of the 36th Ohio Infantry, William A. MacNulty of the 10th New York Infantry “National Guard Zouaves” and 16th Veteran Reserve Corps and Gilbert H. Bates of the 1st Wisconsin Heavy Artillery.

Backdrops, II: Another look at painted backdrops and studio props in 19th century photography (pp. 16-25)
Following the first look at painted backdrop in the March/April 1990 issue, this second survey has considerably more images—36 total portraits taken from the Civil War to World War I. The vast majority was produced during the Civil War period. Perhaps the most unusual is a composite portrait of members of the 23rd Illinois Infantry, which is the centerpiece of the opening spread.

Captain Bob’s Caveat Emptorium (p. 27)
This time, the Captain attempts to pass off portraits of modern re-enactors made by photographer Fritz Kirsch as original images.

A South Carolina Bouquet: Petals that fell from the flower of Southern manhood by John Mills Bigham (pp. 28-29)
Four Palmetto State portraits accompanied by capsule histories of the subject pictured include Pvt. George Clark of the 7th Infantry, brothers Robert Charles Coleman and Henry Alexander Coleman of the 17th Infantry, Lt. Angus Mclean McRae of the 23rd Infantry and Lt. Robert S. Lewis of the 1st Cavalry.

Uniforms & History by Michael J. McAfee (p. 31)
In “62nd Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry ‘Anderson’s Zouaves,’” McAfee examines the uniform and Civil War experiences of this organization. A portrait of Pvt. Isaac Cooper of Company A illustrates the text.

Sutlers’ Row (p. 32)

Back cover
A quarter-plate tintype from the Steven Lister collection is a portrait of pipe-smoking John L.D. Lamar, circa 1856, as a cadet at the Georgia Military Institute in Marietta, Ga.

Finding Aid: March/April 1991

The complete issue

Vol. XII, No. 5
(32 pages)

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Cover image
A quarter-plate tintype from the Ronn Palm collection pictures a Union guidon bearer.

Editor’s Desk (p. 1)
The editor cautions re-enactors not to take at face value that the weapons held by individuals in Civil War portraits belong to the sitters—they may be props.

Mail Call (p. 3)
The letters to the editor include praise for the Confederate issue: “Three cheers and a rebel yell!” exclaims one satisfied reader.

Off Duty: Photos of soldiers at play (pp. 5-9)
A survey of 14 images that span the Civil War through the early 1900s includes the football team of Troops K, 10th U.S. Cavalry, a seamen with a banjo, a soldier getting a shave and more.

Essay: Engineer Images, 1861-1919 by Anthony Gero (pp. 10-11)
The role of combat engineers, part of the American scene since the nation’s founding, receive attention here. The essay is illustrated with five portraits.

The Gettysburg Show—1990 (pp. 12-15)
Photographic highlights of the 16th Annual Mason-Dixon Civil War Show include three soldiers staging mess call, a scout for the 7th U.S. Cavalry, two Zouaves, a soldier darning his sock and a first sergeant in the 12th New York State Militia.

McClellan After Antietam by Marc Daniels with Dean Johnson (pp. 16-21)
The authors examine a photograph of a group that includes members of Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan’s extended family posed on the porch of a home in western Maryland. The residence, as it turns out, is Needwood, located about one mile southeast of Burkittsville. A hand-drawn map shows where photographer Alexander Gardner took the photograph and four other known views of the area.

“I Pride Myself of Having the Best Looking Camp in the Army:” Colonel Nelson A. Miles, 61st New York by Dale Fetzer Jr. (pp. 23-27)
Four outdoor portraits of groups of men who served in Col. Miles’s regiment are at the center of this examination. The groupings pictured include the Drum Corps, the officers of the regiment and companies D, H and F. Also included is an image of Lt. Charles Fuller of Company C, who authored the regimental history.

Uniforms & History by Michael J. McAfee (pp. 28-29)
In “9th Regiment, New York State Militia,” McAfee examines the uniforms and Civil War experiences of this organization. Two portraits, Capt. Jacob Jacobs and an unidentified corporal, illustrate the text.

Passing in Review (p. 31)
Five publications are mentioned, including A Dictionary of Military Quotations (Simon & Schuster) by Trevor Royle, Mosby’s Rangers (Simon & Schuster) by Jeffry D. Wert, Federal Enlisted Uniforms of the Civil War Period by Roberts Video Publishing, Trending the Talking Wire (University of Utah Press) edited by William E. Unrau and Infantryman Pettit: The Civil War Letters of Corporal Frederick Pettit (White Mane Publishing Co,) edited by William Gilfillan Gavin.

Sutlers’ Row (p. 32)

Back cover
A carte de visite from the Mike Hilber collection is a portrait of a newly minted though unidentified brigadier general holding his shoulder straps. A woman assumed to be his wife looks on.

Finding Aid: January/February 1991

The complete issue

Vol. XII, No. 4
(32 pages)

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Cover image
A photo from the Patrick Schroeder collection is a portrait of Pvt. James English of the 21st Virginia Infantry and a friend.

Editor’s Desk (p. 1)
The editor offers best wishes for the holiday season, explains that MI has relocated to larger quarters, and notes that the theme of this issue is Confederates.

Mail Call (p. 3)
The letters to the editor include a challenge to the identification of Robert Emmett Hitchcock as the only U.S. Marine officer to be killed in action during the Civil War and a question about a photo that appeared on page 21 of the July/August 1989 issue.

Passing in Review (p. 5)
Seven publications are mentioned: None Died in Vain: The Saga of the American Civil War (Harper-Collins) by Robert Leckie, The Guns of Cedar Creek (Dell Publishing) by Thomas A. Lewis, Wargaming in History: The American Civil War (Sterling Publishing) by Paul Stevenson, Refugees in Richmond: Civil War Letters of a Virginia Family (Princeton University Press) edited by Henry Blackiston and more.

Under the Stars and Bars: Eleven Vignettes from the Seceded States by John Mills Bigham (pp. 6-11)
The author provides brief narratives of eleven men, one from each Southern state that seceded from the U.S. in 1860-1861.

A Marine on the Raider Alabama: Lt. Becket Kempe Howell, C.S.M.C. by David Sullivan (pp. 12-14)
The life of Mississippi-born Howell and his military experience as an officer in the Confederate Marines is detailed here. The narrative is illustrated with an engraving of Howell and two photographs of him with his crewmates on the Alabama.

Cole Younger in the Missouri State Guard by George Hart (p. 15)
The earliest known image of Younger, who is best known for his association with the outlaw Jesse James, is a sixth-plate tintype of him in the uniform of the Missouri State Guard.

Confederates at Carlisle: Images of Southern Soldiers at the U.S. Army Military History Institute by Michael J. Winey (pp. 16-22)
The mission of Carlisle Barracks to collect a photograph of every Civil War soldier includes contributions by genealogists. Featured here are 21 portraits of Southern soldiers, all of whom are identified.

Uniforms & History by Michael J. McAfee (p. 23)
In “The Confederate Soldier,” McAfee notes the differences in the well-fed early war volunteers and the ragged rebels who remained in the ranks at the end of hostilities.

Grandfather and the Shipwreck by Eugene Miller (pp. 24-25)
The author shares the story of his grandfather, William R. Miller, who served as a fireman on the steam frigate Trenton in the 1880s. A portrait of “Grandpa Miller” and the Trenton illustrate the narrative.

Rebels in the Rear (pp. 26-28)
A total of 15 Confederate portraits submitted by reads over the years are featured here. The soldiers hail from across the Southern states.

Captain Bob’s Caveat Emptorium (pp. 29-31)
The Captain, always the trickster, tries to convince readers that two images are Confederates when in fact they are Italian revolutionary Giuseppe Garibaldi and Sgt. Samuel Gore of the 8th Indiana Cavalry. A third image appears to be an African American or a white man in blackface.

Sutlers’ Row (p. 32)

Back cover
Three unknown Confederates from the collections of Gene Barr, Jimmer Carden and Ron Tunison.

Finding Aid: July/August 1990

The complete issue

Vol. XII, No. 1
(32 pages)

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Cover image
An albumen photograph from the Ted Karle collection pictures Strong Vincent in May 1861, soon after his election as an officer in the Erie Regiment.

Editor’s Desk (p. 1)
The editor announces that this is the second issue to be devoted to Gettysburg. The first was the May/June 1987 issue. Also, a new magazine, Gettysburg, published by Morningside Press, makes its debut.

Mail Call (p. 3)
Letters to the editor include thanks for information about Capt. Curry, the identification of one of the Palmetto soldiers, and more on the proposed Irish Brigade Monument on the battlefield of Antietam.

Passing in Review (p. 5)
Six publications are mentioned: The Confederate States Marine Corps (White Mane Publishing) by Ralph Donnelly, The Civil War: An Aerial Portrait (Thomasson-Grant) by Sam Abell and Brian Pohanka, The Most Famous Soldier in America: A Biography of Lt. Gen. Nelson Miles (Amchan Publications) by Arthur Amchan, Mother, May You Never See the Sights I Have Seen: The 57th Massachusetts Volunteers 1864-65 (Harper & Row) by Warren Wilkinson and more.

Captain Martin’s Photo Album by Peter Jorgensen (pp. 6-8)
Augustus Martin commanded the artillery brigade of the Fifth Corps at the Battle of Gettysburg. He also assembled a photograph album that included 95 cartes de visite. The album was broken up for sale in 1988, and the author was able to obtain eight of them for his collection. The images, all identified, are pictured here.

Four Brothers at Gettysburg by John Mills Bigham (p. 9)
On the afternoon of July 2, 1863, a brigade of South Carolina soldiers commanded by Brig. Gen. Joseph Kershaw went into action. Among the ranks of one of the regiments, the 3rd South Carolina Infantry were the brothers Thomas—William, Thomas, Lewis and John. When the fight was over, only John emerged unscathed.

Old Glory: An album of flag photos by Benedict Maryniak (pp. 10-15)
A survey of 15 images that feature the Stars and Stripes includes the flag-draped winter quarters of Gen. Henry Eustis, a dog with paws around the flag, and soldiers from the Civil War and World War I.

“A Harvest of Death” photo analysis by Marc Daniels and Harry Roach (pp. 16-18)
Modeled on the William A. Frassanito method, the authors explore this iconic image.

“All Over Now” by William A. Frassanito (p. 19)
During the 15 years that have passed since the publication of his landmark book, Gettysburg: A Journey in Time,” the author announces the publication of a follow-up book with all new material. One of the images to be discussed is pictured here—a dead Confederate sharpshooter at the foot of Round Top.

Strong Vincent of the 83rd by Theodore Karle (pp. 21-26)
A profile of the 83rd Pennsylvania and its colonel, Strong Vincent, who was shot and mortally wounded on July 2, 1863, at Little Round Top during the Battle of Gettysburg. Three portraits of young Vincent, and images of other soldiers in the 83rd, illustrate the narrative.

Uniforms & History by Michael J. McAfee (pp. 27-29)
In “The 83rd Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1862,” McAfee explores the dress and regimental record of this organization. The text is illustrated with six portraits of its members and images of a canteen, leather shako and epaulettes.

Captain Bob’s Caveat Emptorium (p. 30)
The captain attempts to pawn off a carte de visite of a French officer as a Confederate.

Sutlers’ Row (pp. 31-32)

Back cover
An image from the collection of Robert Kotchian is a circa 1890 view of the Statue of Liberty.

Finding Aid: May/June 1990

The complete issue

Vol. XI, No. 6
(32 pages)

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Cover image
A selection of images from the Charleston Museum and the South Carolina Confederate Relic Room & Museum pictures unidentified South Carolinians.

Editor’s Desk (p. 1)
The editor announces that Dr. Murat Tekalp of the University of Rochester, N.Y., has developed a computer program that sharpens blurry images, and invites subscribers to visit the MI table at the forthcoming Gettysburg Civil War Show.

Mail Call (pp. 2-3)
Letters to the editor include the identification of a Straggler, artifacts related to Surg. Benjamin Rohrer, more on the recent Baltimore street photograph and a request to expand the magazine to World War II, Korea and Vietnam.

Passing in Review (p. 5)
Three publications are mentioned: Lehigh County, Pennsylvania in the Civil War (self-published) by Richard Matthews, Civil War Letters of the Tenure Family, Rockland County, New York, 1862-1865 (Rockland County Historical Society) edited by Larry Whiteaker and Calvin Dickinson and Damn the Torpedoes: Naval Incidents of the Civil War (John Blair Publishers) by A.A. Hoehling.

Palmetto Soldiers (pp. 6-21)
Author John Mills Bigham declares, “In no other southern state was the enthusiasm for independence more universal” than South Carolina. Ultimately, 60,000 men from the state served in the Confederate armies. A representative survey of images includes 49 portraits and other wartime images. They are grouped in the following categories: Siege of Charleston, The Citadel, Infantry, Cavalry, Prisoners of War and The Final Days.

The “Aerial Telegraph:” A Brief History of the Signal Corps in the Civil War Era by Stephen Siemsen (pp. 22-26)
On the occasion of the 130th anniversary of the appointment of Albert J. Myer as Signal Officer of the Army, the author profiles the Corps and its contributions to the Union during the Civil War. The narrative is illustrated with a portrait of Myer prior to the war, and 10 other images.

Uniforms & History by Michael J. McAfee (p. 27)
In “72nd Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry (Baxter’s Philadelphia Fire Zouaves),” McAfee explores the dress and regimental record of this organization. The text is illustrated with unidentified portraits of a sergeant and a hospital steward.

Stragglers (pp. 29-31)
A total of 8 images submitted by readers includes a circa 1890 military photographer, Pvt. John Sharper of the 14th Rhode Island Heavy Artillery (Colored), which later became the 8th U.S. Colored Heavy Artillery, and a Union soldier with a Burnside carbine.

Sutlers’ Row (p. 32)

Back cover
Four images are pictured: A Confederate officer, two men who wear what appear to be antebellum military uniforms and a woman.

Finding Aid: March/April 1990

The complete issue

Vol. XI, No. 5
(32 pages)

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Inside

Cover image
A quarter-plate tintype from the Charles Manual collection pictures Union army Surg. Benjamin Rohrer and his 10-year-old daughter, Ida.

Editor’s Desk (p. 1)
The editor introduces two themes in this issue, the annual marking of St. Patrick’s Day and photographic backdrops.

Mail Call (p. 3)
Letters to the editor include praise for the recent all-North Carolina issue and more on the proposed Irish Brigade monument on the Antietam battlefield.

Passing in Review (p. 5)
Five publications are mentioned: Civil War Ladies: Fashions and Needle-Arts of the Early 1860’s (R.L. Shep), Eyewitness to War: Prints and Daguerreotypes of the Mexican War, 1846-1848 (Smithsonian Institution Press) by Martha Sandweiss, Rick Stewart and Ben Huseman, Warships of the Civil War Navies (The U.S. Naval Institute Press) by Paul H. Silverstone, Jubal Early’s Raid on Washington 1864 (The Nautical & Aviation Publishing Co.) by B.F. Cooling and Forged in Battle: The Civil War Alliance of Black Soldiers and White Officers (The Free Press) by Joseph T. Glatthaar.

Backdrops (pp. 6-10)
In the May/June 1989 issue, we examined the Benton Barracks backdrop connected to St. Louis photographer Enoch Long. This prompted a deeper and more organized look, and ultimately this survey of 17 portraits. Each soldier stands in front of an elaborately painted backdrop.

The Gabled House Mystery by Greg Mast (pp. 11-13)
The author examined about 400 images of North Carolina soldiers in preparation for his recent survey, Tar Heels! A group of those images, 21 in total, shared an uncommon painted backdrop of a scene that includes a residence with a gabled roof. What follows is a discussion of the images, seven of which are included, with the hope of someday identifying the mystery photographer.

Through Hades With His Hat Off: The strange career of A.J. Morrison by Joseph Bilby (pp. 14-15)
Andrew Jackson Morrison exhibited military ambition at an early age, and the impulse followed him from the Mexican War to Nicaragua to the Civil War. In the latter conflict, he served as colonel of two New Jersey regiments, the 26th Infantry and the 3rd Cavalry.

A Touch of Green Among the Blue: A look at the Irish in the Army of the Potomac by Jack McCormack (pp. 16-20)
This look at soldiers of Irish descent who served in the main federal army of the East is illustrated with 15 images, all but one of which is identified. They include a previously unpublished portrait of Gen. Thomas F. Meagher of the Irish Brigade with Col. Robert Nugent of the 69th New York Infantry and Capt. James McArdle of the 28th Massachusetts Infantry.

A Family Affair: Four generations in uniform by Maj. Roy Goodale (pp. 21-23)
The author traces the military history of his family. The narrative is illustrated with portraits of Greenleaf Austin Goodale of the 6th Maine Infantry, Corps d’Afrique and the regular army, West Point graduate George S. Goodale, and the author with his two children, Barbara and Roy, who serve in the military.

A Double Sacrifice by Timothy Brookes (p. 24)
The author received a gift of two unidentified Union soldier portraits from a friend. Thus began an adventure that led to the discovery of their identities, Benjamin F. and Joseph F. Orr of the 76th Ohio Infantry, and their tragic fates during the Civil War.

Private Burton Marchbanks by Michael Dan Jones (p. 25)
The life and military service of Marchbanks, who served in the 30th Texas Cavalry, is illustrated with his portrait and an image of his surviving frock coat. Wounded at the Battle of Honey Springs, Indian Territory, also known as the Battle of Elk Creek, he died of complications from the injury.

Uniforms & History by Michael J. McAfee (pp. 26-27)
In “69th Regiment, New York State Militia—‘The National Cadets’—1861,” McAfee explores the dress and regimental record of this organization. The text is illustrated with two portraits of soldiers clad in the full dress and undress uniforms worn by the regiment.

Stragglers (pp. 28-31)
A total of 14 images submitted by readers includes brothers James and John Lowe of the 13th Mississippi Infantry, an albumen print identified as the “Johnston Militia” and Confederate prisoners of war at Camp Douglas, Ill.

Sutlers’ Row (p. 32)

Back cover
Two images are pictured: A soldier from Davidson County, N.C., and an unidentified sailor.

Finding Aid: January/February 1990

The complete issue

Vol. XI, No. 4
(32 pages)

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Inside

Cover image
carte de visite from the New York State Division of Military & Naval Affairs pictures James W. Singleton, who appears to have suffered amputation of the right foot.

Editor’s Desk (p. 1)
The editor wishes subscribers a Happy New Year—and a new decade.

Mail Call (p. 3)
Letters to the editor include a note from the Save Historic Antietam Foundation, Inc., on efforts to establish an Irish Brigade monument on the battlefield, praise for Greg Mast’s Tar Heels and a firsthand account of the hanging of Sam Davis.

Passing in Review (pp. 4-5)
A total of 11 publications are mentioned: Union Forces of the American Civil War (Arms and Armor Press) by Philip Katcher, Antietam: The Soldier’s Battle (White Mane Publishing) by John Priest, Paper Medicine Man: John Bourke and His American West (University of Oklahoma Press) by Joseph C. Porter, Rebels and Yankees: Fighting Men of the Civil War (Gallery Books) by William C. Davis with Russ Pritchard and more.

G.O. No. 286 by Wendell Lang (pp. 6-7)
A general order dated Nov. 22, 1864, allowed Union officers to dispense with shoulder straps and other conspicuous insignia of rank. This was part of an effort by the military to prevent enemy sharpshooters from killing officers. Three portraits illustrate the text.

John Coffer, Photographer: Profile of an antiquarian lensman by Philip Katcher (pp. 8-11)
The story of modern tintype maker John A. Coffer of Dundee, N.Y., discusses how he got started, the process of photography and other aspects of his work. The narrative is illustrated with a half-dozen contemporary images.

The First Navy Cross: Biography of a Hero by Charles Schwartz (pp. 12-13)
The story of Charles Joseph Libby and his courage after the vessel in which he was assigned, the Shaw, was accidently struck by the HMS Aquitania. Libby’s portrait and other images illustrate the narrative.

An Ironclad Forgery by Jerry Harlowe (pp. 14-15)
The author shares the backstory of a 100-year-old stereoview that purports to be the famed ironclad Monitor when in fact it is a doctored view of the monitor class warship Passaic.

Empire State Soldiers: Images from New York’s Bureau of Military Statistics by Michael Winey (pp. 16-24)
In late 1862, the Bureau of Military Statistics of the State of New York was established to preserve soldier names, regimental records and community aid efforts to the military. What followed was an impressive effort to catalog, among other items, more than 2,000 soldier photographs. A sampling of these images, 24 in total, is included in this survey. They include the first chief of the Bureau, Col. Lockwood Lyon Doty, a trio of privates from the 93rd New York Infantry who appear to be former prisoners of war, and portraits of Capt. William Glenny, 64th New York Infantry, before and after his wounding at the Battle of Fair Oaks, Va.

Uniforms & History by Michael J. McAfee (p. 25)
In “143rd Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry, 1862,” McAfee explores the dress and regimental record of this organization. The text is illustrated with a portrait of Sgt. Austin Race of Company E.

Zouaves in the Streets of Baltimore by Ross Kelbaugh (pp. 26-27)
A photograph of soldiers purported to be the 5th New York in the streets of Baltimore during the winter of 1861-1862 is in fact the 6th Maryland National Guard in 1868. The author explains how he solved the photographic mystery.

Stragglers (pp. 28-32)
A total of 11 images submitted by readers includes an eight-plate tintype of a locomotive, a group of Union soldiers massed beneath a great arch to which is attached a shield with the name McClellan written upon it, and identified Marine, circa 1900-1914, and more.

Sutlers’ Row (Inside back cover)

Back cover
Quarter-plate ambrotype circa 1854 of an unidentified soldier photographed by Isaac Rehn of Philadelphia, Pa.